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Publication Type CH
Authors Gilbert, A. A. and L. H. Fraser
Book Author M. A. Khan, B. Boer, M. Ozturk, M. ClusenerGodt, B. Gul and S. W. Breckle
Editors M. A. Khan, B. Boer, M. Ozturk, M. ClusenerGodt, B. Gul and S. W. Breckle
Title Effects of Competition, Salinity and Disturbance on the Growth of Poa pratensis (Kentucky Bluegrass) and Puccinellia nuttalliana (Nuttall's Alkaligrass)
Source Sabkha Ecosystems Vol V: The Americas
Author Keywords plant-species density british-columbia biomass accumulation environmental-change strategy theory climate-change gradient marsh consequences communities
Abstract Saline wetland and ponds in Canada can be found in arid and semi-arid regions where evaporation exceeds precipitation. An increase in salinity can reduce plant growth and affect competitive interactions between plants. A field experiment and a greenhouse experiment tested the effects of salinity and competition on the growth of two wetland plants, Poa pratensis (a glycophyte) and Puccinellia nuttalliana (a halophyte). For the field experiment, seedlings of Poa pratensis and Puccinellia nuttalliana were transplanted to six sites (two highly saline, two moderate, and two at low salinity) with and without plant neighbours. All sites were affected by high mortality and poor growth of the transplants. Survivorship was greater for plants grown alone. Biomass of plants grown alone was greatest at one of the moderate saline sites. The greenhouse experiment tested the response of P. nuttalliana and P. pratensis in a factorial design with 70 combinations (2 species x 7 salinity x 5 competition) replicated 6 times. Both of the species' biomass was greatest when grown alone without salt. Species, salt type and competition had greatest effect on survivorship. Puccinellia nuttalliana displayed a greater degree of salt tolerance than P. pratensis. Re-growth after clipping was suppressed at higher salinities. Our results indicate that the interactions between plant species, salinity and clipping (or grazing) can affect the potential quality and quantity of forage for livestock and wildlife.
Author Address [Gilbert, Ashleigh Anne; Fraser, Lauchlan Hugh] Thompson Rivers Univ, Dept Nat Resource Sci, Kamloops, BC, Canada. Fraser, LH (reprint author), Thompson Rivers Univ, Dept Nat Resource Sci, Kamloops, BC, Canada. Lfraser@tru.ca
ISSN 978-3-319-27093-7; 978-3-319-27091-3
ISBN 978-3-319-27093-7; 978-3-319-27091-3
Year Published 2016
Volume 48
Beginning Page 349-367
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/978-3-319-27093-7_19
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000387124200022
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