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Publication Type CH
Authors Carter, C. T., H. E. Ballard and I. A. Ungar
Book Author M. A. Khan, B. Boer, M. Ozturk, M. ClusenerGodt, B. Gul and S. W. Breckle
Editors M. A. Khan, B. Boer, M. Ozturk, M. ClusenerGodt, B. Gul and S. W. Breckle
Title Genetic Variability of Three Annual Halophyte Species in an Inland Salt Marsh Through Time
Source Sabkha Ecosystems Vol V: The Americas
Author Keywords salicornia-europaea l seed bank spergularia-marina lesquerella-fendleri desert mustard populations diversity chenopodiaceae germination brassicaceae
Abstract Soil seed banks have been proposed to be a repository of genetic information and reported to be more genetically diverse than a single population at any given point in time. Genetic diversity of three annual autogamous halophytic species (Atriplex prostrata, Salicornia depressa, and Spergularia salina) from an inland salt marsh community was compared within and among three cohorts representing populations from 1981, 1998, and the persistent seed bank of 2000 using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) analysis. Genetic variation was assayed using three primers on 30 samples (individuals) for each cohort of each species. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) showed that cohorts were significantly different for each species. Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) indicated a high degree of separation for the three cohorts of each species, indicating a turnover in genetic composition over the 17-year period and between above-and belowground cohorts. Percent polymorphic loci indicated the 2000 seed bank of S. salina and S. depressa were less diverse than either cohort representing 1981 or 1998 (the seed bank of S. salina was monomorphic), but the persistent seed bank from 2000 of A. prostrata was more diverse than either the 1981 or 1998 aboveground cohorts. Overall diversity increased from 1981 to 1998 for S. salina and A. prostrata, but decreased for S. depressa. Our findings show that seed banks are not always a long-term repository of genetic information and can be less genetically diverse than any one population. Genetic diversity may increase or decrease for a given population over time. More multi-year or cross-decade investigations on seed banks and aboveground vegetation in wetland species, especially those found in extreme habitats such as inland salt marshes, are needed.
Author Address [Carter, Christy T.] Wingate Univ, Dept Biol, 216 Cedar St, Wingate, NC 28174 USA. [Ballard, Harvey E., Jr.; Ungar, Irwin A.] Ohio Univ, Dept Environm & Plant Biol, Athens, OH 45701 USA. Carter, CT (reprint author), Wingate Univ, Dept Biol, 216 Cedar St, Wingate, NC 28174 USA. c.carter@wingate.edu
ISSN 978-3-319-27093-7; 978-3-319-27091-3
ISBN 978-3-319-27093-7; 978-3-319-27091-3
Year Published 2016
Volume 48
Beginning Page 105-118
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/978-3-319-27093-7_7
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000387124200010
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