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Publication Type J
Authors Asad, A.
Title Growing Atriplex and Maireana species in saline sodic and waterlogged soils
Source Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Abstract Utilization of salt affected wasteland by growing forage shrubs has enormous economic and environmental implication for developing countries like Pakistan, where approximately 6.3 million ha of the land is salt affected. Considering the importance of Atriplex and Maireana species, research has been conducted using their different species on the salt affected soils of Faisalabad. Most of Atriplex and Maireana species survived under the environmental conditions of Faisalabad and gave the good yield in the form of forage. Some of these species are woody and can be used for fuel purposes. Sixteen genotypes of Atriplex and Maireana were tested for their tolerance to waterlogging in order to identify halophytic fodder shrubs suitable for growth on secondary salt-affected and waterlogged farmland. The physiological and morphological responses of the species tested were typical of species with a generally poor tolerance to waterlogging. Despite this, some species (e.g., A. amnicola) were surprisingly resistant, surviving up to five months of waterlogging at moderate salinity and high evapotranspirational demand. The most resistant species, A amnicola maintained higher transpiration rates, leaf water potentials and shoot extension rates than most other species during five weeks of waterlogging, and a return to control levels more quickly than other species after plots were drained. Although little morphological adaptation to waterlogged conditions was detected, a shallow and extensive lateral root system and the formation of many short aerenchymatous adventitious roots from procumbent branches appeared to advantage A. amnicola in an environment highly heterogeneous in salinity and low in oxygen concentration. Waterlogging quickly killed shallow fibrous rooted species, although the procumbent branches of some individuals survived as clones if they developed adventitious roots.
ISSN 0010-3624
ISBN 0010-3624
Publication Date 2002
Year Published 2002
Volume 33
Issue 5-6
Beginning Page 973-989
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1081/css-120003078
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000175024700022
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