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Publication Type J
Authors Marchesini, V. A., J. P. Guerschman, R. M. Schweiggert, T. D. Colmer and E. J. Veneklaas
Title Spectral detection of stress-related pigments in salt-lake succulent halophytic shrubs
Source International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation
Author Keywords Inland marshes Betacyanin Chlorophyll Halophytes Spectral indices Plant reflectance Samphire Tecticornia indica Tecticornia auriculata anthocyanins reflectance plants carotenoids salinity wetland photosynthesis betacyanin betalains australia
Abstract The spectral detection of vegetation pigment concentrations has a high potential value, but it is still underdeveloped, especially for pigments other than chlorophylls. In this study, the seasonal pigment dynamics of two Tecticornia species (samphires; halophytic shrubs) from north-western Australia were correlated with spectral indices that best document the pigment changes over time. Pigment dynamics were assessed by analysing betacyanin, chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations at plant level and by measuring reflectance at contrasting seasonal dates. Plant reflectance was used to define a new reflectance index that was most sensitive to the seasonal shifts in Tecticornia pigment concentrations. The two Tecticornia species turned from green to red-pinkish for the period March-August 2012 when betacyanins increased almost nine times in both species. Chlorophyll levels showed the opposite pattern to that of betacyanins, whereas carotenoid levels were relatively stable. Normalised difference indices correlated well with betacyanin (r = 0.805, using bands at 600 and 620 nm) and chlorophyll (r = 0.809, using bands at 737 and 726 nm). Using knowledge of chlorophyll concentrations slightly improved the ability of the spectral index to predict betacyanin concentration (r = 0.822 at bands 606 and 620 nm, in the case of chemically determined chlorophyll, r = 0.809 when using remotely sensed chlorophyll). Our results suggest that this new spectral index can reliably detect changes in betacyanin concentrations in vegetation, with potential applications in ecological studies and environmental impact monitoring. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Marchesini, Victoria A.; Colmer, Timothy D.; Veneklaas, Erik J.] Univ Western Australia, Sch Plant Biol, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. [Marchesini, Victoria A.] GEA IMASL CONICET, Ejercito Andes 950, San Luis, Argentina. [Guerschman, Juan P.] CSIRO Land & Water, GPO Box 1666, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. [Schweiggert, Ralf M.] Univ Hohenheim, Inst Food Sci & Biotechnol, D-70599 Stuttgart, Germany. Marchesini, VA (reprint author), Univ Western Australia, Sch Plant Biol, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. victoria.marchesini@gmail.com
ISSN 0303-2434
ISBN 0303-2434
29-Character Source Abbreviation Int. J. Appl. Earth Obs. Geoinf.
Publication Date Oct
Year Published 2016
Volume 52
Beginning Page 457-463
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.jag.2016.07.002
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000383003500042
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