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Publication Type J
Authors Ben Hamed-Laouti, I., D. Arbelet-Bonnin, L. De Bont, B. Biligui, B. Gakiere, C. Abdelly, K. Ben Hamed and F. Bouteau
Title Comparison of NaCl-induced programmed cell death in the obligate halophyte Cakile maritima and the glycophyte Arabidospis thaliana
Source Plant Science
Author Keywords Antioxidant Arabidopsis thaliana Cakile maritima Mitochondria Non-selective cation channels Programmed cell death Reactive oxygen species Salt stress nonselective cation channels plant salt-tolerance transition pore status arabidopsis-thaliana salinity tolerance hyperosmotic stress abiotic stress voltage-clamp na+ transport durum-wheat
Abstract Salinity represents one of the most important constraints that adversely affect plants growth and productivity. In this study, we aimed at determining possible differences between salt tolerant and salt sensitive species in early salt stress response. To this purpose, we subjected suspension-cultured cells from the halophyte Cakile maritima and the glycophyte Arabidopsis thaliana, two Brassicaceae, to salt stress and compared their behavior. In both species we could observe a time and dose dependent programmed cell death requiring an active metabolism, a dysfunction of mitochondria and caspase-like activation although C. maritima cells appeared less sensitive than A. thaliana cells. This capacity to mitigate salt stress could be due to a higher ascorbate pool that could allow C maritima reducing the oxidative stress generated in response to NaCl. It further appeared that a higher number of C. maritima cultured cells when compared to A. thaliana could efficiently manage the Na+ accumulation into the cytoplasm through non selective cation channels allowing also reducing the ROS generation and the subsequent cell death. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Ben Hamed-Laouti, Ibtissem; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Bouteau, Francois] Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Lab Interdisciplinaire Energies Demain, Paris, France. [Ben Hamed-Laouti, Ibtissem; Abdelly, Chedly; Ben Hamed, Karim] Univ Carthage Tunis, Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [De Bont, Linda; Gakiere, Bertrand] Inst Plant Sci Paris Saclay, UMR 9213, Bat 630, F-91405 Orsay, France. Bouteau, F (reprint author), Univ Paris 07, LIED, Case Courrier 7040 Lamarck, F-75205 Paris 13, France. francois.bouteau@univ-paris-diderot.fr
ISSN 0168-9452
ISBN 0168-9452
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Sci.
Publication Date Jun
Year Published 2016
Volume 247
Beginning Page 49-59
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plantsci.2016.03.003
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000375502200005
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