Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Wang, J. C., L. R. Yao, B. C. Li, Y. X. Meng, X. L. Ma, Y. Lai, E. J. Si, P. R. Ren, K. Yang, X. W. Shang and H. J. Wang
Title Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cultured Suspension Cells of the Halophyte Halogeton glomeratus by iTRAQ Provides Insights into Response Mechanisms to Salt Stress
Source Frontiers in Plant Science
Author Keywords halophyte H. glomeratus iTRAQ salt tolerance cells response mechanisms protein profile analysis salinity-tolerance thellungiella-halophila abiotic stresses root proteome plant arabidopsis reveals barley leaves
Abstract Soil salinity severely threatens land use capability and crop yields worldwide. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes will contribute to the development of salt-tolerant crops. In this study, a combination of physiological characteristics and iTRAQ-based proteomic approaches was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the salt response of suspension cell cultures of halophytic Halogeton glomeratus. These cells showed halophytic growth responses comparable to those of the whole plant. In total, 97 up-regulated proteins and 192 down-regulated proteins were identified as common to both 200 and 400 mM NaCl concentration treatments. Such salinity responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy, carbohydrate metabolism, stress defense, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth, and cytoskeleton metabolism. Effective regulatory protein expression related to energy, stress defense, and carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in the salt-tolerance of H. glomeratus suspension cell cultures. However, known proteins regulating Na+ efflux from the cytoplasm and its compartmentalization into the vacuole did not change significantly under salinity stress suggesting our existing knowledge concerning Na+ extrusion and compartmentalization in halophytes needs to be evaluated further. Such data are discussed in the context of our current understandings of the mechanisms involved in the salinity response of the halophyte, H. glomeratus.
Author Address [Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Li, Baochun; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Wang, Huajun] Gansu Key Lab Crop Improvement & Germplasm Enhanc, Gansu Prov Key Lab Aridland Crop Sci, Lanzhou, Peoples R China. [Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun] Gansu Agr Univ, Coll Agron, Dept Crop Genet & Breeding, Lanzhou, Peoples R China. [Li, Baochun] Gansu Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, Lanzhou, Peoples R China. [Lai, Yong] Qinghai Univ, Coll Agr & Anim Husb, Dept Agr & Forestry, Xining, Peoples R China. Wang, HJ (reprint author), Gansu Key Lab Crop Improvement & Germplasm Enhanc, Gansu Prov Key Lab Aridland Crop Sci, Lanzhou, Peoples R China.; Wang, HJ (reprint author), Gansu Agr Univ, Coll Agron, Dept Crop Genet & Breeding, Lanzhou, Peoples R China. whuajun@yahoo.com
ISSN 1664-462X
ISBN 1664-462X
29-Character Source Abbreviation Front. Plant Sci.
Publication Date Feb
Year Published 2016
Volume 7
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3389/fpls.2016.00110
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000369802400002
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed