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Publication Type J
Authors Yakir, D. and Y. Yechieli
Title PLANT INVASION OF NEWLY EXPOSED HYPERSALINE DEAD-SEA SHORES
Source Nature
Abstract THE level of the Dead Sea, the lowest (about -400 m) and one of the most salty (salinity about 340 g l(-1))lakes on earth, is lowering at a rate of approximately 0.5 m annually owing to extensive exploitation of its main perennial tributary (the Jordan River) and the extreme aridity of the region (annual precipitation is about 60 mm)(1). Consequently, new hypersaline sea shores are exposed, forming a unique, originally sterile ecosystem. The first plants invade these newly exposed shores after several years while soil water salinity is still extremely high, Here we use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to show that a variety of such perennial pioneer plants are able to make use of occasional floodwater which is distinct from the bulk of the hypersaline soil water found in their root zone. Our results provide new insight into the ways in which plants can invade extremely hostile environments and extend their ecological limits of distribution.
Author Address GEOL SURVEY ISRAEL,IL-95501 JERUSALEM,ISRAEL. YAKIR, D (reprint author), WEIZMANN INST SCI,DEPT ENVIRONM SCI & ENERGY RES,IL-76100 REHOVOT,ISRAEL.
ISSN 0028-0836
ISBN 0028-0836
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 1995
Volume 374
Issue 6525
Beginning Page 803-805
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1038/374803a0
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1995QV31500044
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