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Publication Type J
Authors Dangremond, E. M., I. C. Feller and W. P. Sousa
Title Environmental tolerances of rare and common mangroves along light and salinity gradients
Source Oecologia
Author Keywords Mangrove Distribution Rarity Stress tolerance Pelliciera rhizophorae rhizophora-mangle l chlorophyll fluorescence pelliciera-rhizophorae regional distribution geographical range field conditions niche breadth growth photosynthesis forest
Abstract Although mangroves possess a variety of morphological and physiological adaptations for life in a stressful habitat, interspecific differences in survival and growth under different environmental conditions can shape their local and geographic distributions. Soil salinity and light are known to affect mangrove performance, often in an interactive fashion. It has also been hypothesized that mangroves are intrinsically shade intolerant due to the high physiological cost of coping with saline flooded soils. To evaluate the relationship between stress tolerance and species distributions, we compared responses of seedlings of three widespread mangrove species and one narrow endemic mangrove species in a factorial array of light levels and soil salinities in an outdoor laboratory experiment. The more narrowly distributed species was expected to exhibit a lower tolerance of potentially stressful conditions. Two of the widespread species, Avicennia germinans and Lumnitzera racemosa, survived and grew well at low-medium salinity, regardless of light level, but performed poorly at high salinity, particularly under high light. The third widespread species, Rhizophora mangle, responded less to variation in light and salinity. However, at high salinity, its relative growth rate was low at every light level and none of these plants flushed leaves. As predicted, the rare species, Pelliciera rhizophorae, was the most sensitive to environmental stressors, suffering especially high mortality and reduced growth and quantum yield under the combined conditions of high light and medium-high salinity. That it only thrives under shaded conditions represents an important exception to the prevailing belief that halophytes are intrinsically constrained to be shade intolerant.
Author Address [Dangremond, Emily M.; Sousa, Wayne P.] Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Integrat Biol, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA. Dangremond, EM (reprint author), Smithsonian Environm Res Ctr, 647 Contees Wharf Rd, Edgewater, MD 21037 USA. dangremonde@si.edu
ISSN 0029-8549
ISBN 0029-8549
Publication Date Dec
Year Published 2015
Volume 179
Issue 4
Beginning Page 1187-1198
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s00442-015-3408-1
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