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Publication Type J
Authors Bankaji, I., I. Cacador and N. Sleimi
Title Physiological and biochemical responses of Suaeda fruticosa to cadmium and copper stresses: growth, nutrient uptake, antioxidant enzymes, phytochelatin, and glutathione levels
Source Environmental Science and Pollution Research
Author Keywords Suaeda fruticosa Cd and Cu toxicity Antioxidant enzymes Glutathione Cd accumulation Growth rate heavy-metal detoxification induced oxidative stress bacopa-monnieri l lipid-peroxidation mesembryanthemum-crystallinum sesuvium-portulacastrum abiotic stresses brassica-juncea plant-responses accumulation
Abstract Environmental pollution by trace metal elements (TMEs) is a serious problem worldwide, increasing in parallel with the development of human technology. The present research aimed to examine the response of halophytic species Suaeda fruticosa to oxidative stress posed by combined abiotic stresses. Plants have been grown for 1 month with an irrigation solution supplemented with 200 mM NaCl and 400 mu M Cd2+ or 400 mu M Cu2+. The level of glutathione (GSH), phytochelatins (PCs), and antioxidant enzyme activities [ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT)] as well as lipid peroxidation was studied to see the stress exerted by the TME and the level of tolerance and detoxification strategy adopted by S. fruticosa. Relative growth rate (RGR) decreased under Cd2+ stress in this species, whereas Cu2+ did not have any impact on S. fruticosa performance. Cd2+ or Cu2+ enhanced malondialdehyde, suggesting reactive oxygen species-induced disruption of membrane integrity and oxidative stress in S. fruticosa. On the other hand, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes CAT, APX, and GPX diminished and mineral nutrition was disturbed by metal stress. S. fruticosa was able to synthesize PCs in response to TME toxicity. However, data indicate that GSH levels underwent a significant decrease in roots and leaves of S. fruticosa stressed by Cd2+ or Cu2+. The GSH depletion accompanied by the increase of phytochelatin concentration suggests the involvement of GSH in the synthesis of phytochelatins.
Author Address [Bankaji, I.; Sleimi, N.] Univ Carthage, Fac Sci Bizerte, UR Mat Nanomat & Ecosyst, Jarzouna 7021, Bizerte, Tunisia. [Cacador, I.] Univ Lisbon, Fac Ciencias, MARE Marine & Environm Sci Ctr, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. Sleimi, N (reprint author), Univ Carthage, Fac Sci Bizerte, UR Mat Nanomat & Ecosyst, Jarzouna 7021, Bizerte, Tunisia. insafbanc@yahoo.fr; micacador@fc.ul.pt; noomene.sleimi@gmail.com
ISSN 0944-1344
ISBN 0944-1344
29-Character Source Abbreviation Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res.
Publication Date Sep
Year Published 2015
Volume 22
Issue 17
Beginning Page 13058-13069
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s11356-015-4414-x
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000360311500028
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