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Publication Type J
Authors Yuan, J. J., W. X. Ding, D. Y. Liu, H. Kang, C. Freeman, J. Xiang and Y. X. Lin
Title Exotic Spartina alterniflora invasion alters ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and N2O and carbon sequestration in a coastal salt marsh in China
Source Global Change Biology
Author Keywords atmospheric N2O consumption carbon sequestration GWP N-limit Spartina alterniflora invasion sulfate AMMONIA-OXIDIZING BACTERIA NITROUS-OXIDE METHANE EMISSIONS PLANT INVASION FRESH-WATER PHRAGMITES-AUSTRALIS ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION VASCULAR PLANTS TIDAL MARSHES
Abstract Coastal salt marshes are sensitive to global climate change and may play an important role in mitigating global warming. To evaluate the impacts of Spartina alterniflora invasion on global warming potential (GWP) in Chinese coastal areas, we measured CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil organic carbon sequestration rates along a transect of coastal wetlands in Jiangsu province, China, including open water; bare tidal flat; and invasive S. alterniflora, native Suaeda salsa, and Phragmites australis marshes. Annual CH4 emissions were estimated as 2.81, 4.16, 4.88, 10.79, and 16.98kg CH(4)ha(-1) for open water, bare tidal flat, and P. australis, S. salsa, and S. alterniflora marshes, respectively, indicating that S. alterniflora invasion increased CH4 emissions by 57-505%. In contrast, negative N2O fluxes were found to be significantly and negatively correlated (P<0.001) with net ecosystem CO2 exchange during the growing season in S. alterniflora and P. australis marshes. Annual N2O emissions were 0.24, 0.38, and 0.56kg N(2)Oha(-1) in open water, bare tidal flat and S. salsa marsh, respectively, compared with -0.51kg N(2)Oha(-1) for S. alterniflora marsh and -0.25kg N(2)Oha(-1) for P. australis marsh. The carbon sequestration rate of S. alterniflora marsh amounted to 3.16 Mg Cha(-1)yr(-1) in the top 100cm soil profile, a value that was 2.63- to 8.78-fold higher than in native plant marshes. The estimated GWP was 1.78, -0.60, -4.09, and -1.14Mg CO(2)eq ha(-1)yr(-1) in open water, bare tidal flat, P. australis marsh and S. salsa marsh, respectively, but dropped to -11.30Mg CO(2)eqha(-1)yr(-1) in S. alterniflora marsh. Our results indicate that although S. alterniflora invasion stimulates CH4 emissions, it can efficiently mitigate increases in atmospheric CO2 and N2O along the coast of China.
Author Address [Yuan, Junji; Ding, Weixin; Liu, Deyan; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Soil Sci, State Key Lab Soil & Sustainable Agr, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu, Peoples R China. [Yuan, Junji; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin] Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 10049, Peoples R China. [Kang, Hojeong] Yonsei Univ, Sch Civil & Environm Engn, Seoul 120749, South Korea. [Freeman, Chris] Bangor Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Bangor LL57 2UW, Gwynedd, Wales. Ding, WX (reprint author), Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Soil Sci, State Key Lab Soil & Sustainable Agr, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu, Peoples R China. wxding@issas.ac.cn
ISSN 1354-1013
ISBN 1354-1013
29-Character Source Abbreviation Glob. Change Biol.
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2015
Volume 21
Issue 4
Beginning Page 1567-1580
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/gcb.12797
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000351214100019
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