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Publication Type J
Authors Wang, J. C., Y. X. Meng, B. C. Li, X. L. Ma, Y. Lai, E. J. Si, K. Yang, X. L. Xu, X. W. Shang, H. J. Wang and D. Wang
Title Physiological and proteomic analyses of salt stress response in the halophyte Halogeton glomeratus
Source Plant Cell and Environment
Author Keywords EST database physiology proteomic salinity tolerance NA+/H+ ANTIPORTER GENE THAUMATIN-LIKE PROTEIN THELLUNGIELLA-HALOPHILA SALINITY TOLERANCE SUAEDA-SALSA MASS-SPECTROMETRY MOLECULAR-CLONING PUCCINELLIA-TENUIFLORA SALICORNIA-EUROPAEA TRANSGENIC TOBACCO
Abstract Very little is known about the adaptation mechanism of Chenopodiaceae Halogeton glomeratus, a succulent annual halophyte, under saline conditions. In this study, we investigated the morphological and physiological adaptation mechanisms of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of NaCl treatment for 21d. Our results revealed that H.glomeratus has a robust ability to tolerate salt; its optimal growth occurs under approximately 100mm NaCl conditions. Salt crystals were deposited in water-storage tissue under saline conditions. We speculate that osmotic adjustment may be the primary mechanism of salt tolerance in H.glomeratus, which transports toxic ions such as sodium into specific salt-storage cells and compartmentalizes them in large vacuoles to maintain the water content of tissues and the succulence of the leaves. To investigate the molecular response mechanisms to salt stress in H.glomeratus, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves that had been exposed to 200mm NaCl for 24h, 72h and 7d. Forty-nine protein spots, exhibiting significant changes in abundance after stress, were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS) and similarity searches across EST database of H.glomeratus. These stress-responsive proteins were categorized into nine functional groups, such as photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and stress and defence response.
Author Address [Wang, Juncheng; Meng, Yaxiong; Li, Baochun; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xianliang; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun; Wang, Di] Gansu Key Lab Crop Improvement & Germplasm Enhanc, Gansu Prov Key Lab Aridland Crop Sci, Lanzhou 730070, Peoples R China. [Wang, Juncheng; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xianliang; Wang, Huajun; Wang, Di] Gansu Agr Univ, Coll Agron, Lanzhou 730070, Peoples R China. [Li, Baochun] Gansu Agr Univ, Coll Life Sci & Technol, Lanzhou 730070, Peoples R China. Wang, HJ (reprint author), Gansu Key Lab Crop Improvement & Germplasm Enhanc, Gansu Prov Key Lab Aridland Crop Sci, Lanzhou 730070, Peoples R China. whuajun@yahoo.com
ISSN 0140-7791
ISBN 0140-7791
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Cell Environ.
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2015
Volume 38
Issue 4
Beginning Page 655-669
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/pce.12428
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000351378800004
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