Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.18
or
Publication Type J
Authors Tsukagoshi, H., T. Suzuki, K. Nishikawa, S. Agarie, S. Ishiguro and T. Higashiyama
Title RNA-Seq Analysis of the Response of the Halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (Ice Plant) to High Salinity
Source Plos One
Author Keywords BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR IMPROVES DROUGHT TOLERANCE INDUCED OVER-EXPRESSION SALT-TOLERANCE ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA ABIOTIC STRESS GENE-EXPRESSION GENOME GROWTH COMPONENT
Abstract Understanding the molecular mechanisms that convey salt tolerance in plants is a crucial issue for increasing crop yield. The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) is a halophyte that is capable of growing under high salt conditions. For example, the roots of ice plant seedlings continue to grow in 140 mM NaCl, a salt concentration that completely inhibits Arabidopsis thaliana root growth. Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for this high level of salt tolerance in a halophyte has the potential of revealing tolerance mechanisms that have been evolutionarily successful. In the present study, deep sequencing (RNAseq) was used to examine gene expression in ice plant roots treated with various concentrations of NaCl. Sequencing resulted in the identification of 53,516 contigs, 10,818 of which were orthologs of Arabidopsis genes. In addition to the expression analysis, a web-based ice plant database was constructed that allows broad public access to the data. The results obtained from an analysis of the RNAseq data were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Novel patterns of gene expression in response to high salinity within 24 hours were identified in the ice plant when the RNAseq data from the ice plant was compared to gene expression data obtained from Arabidopsis plants exposed to high salt. Although ABA responsive genes and a sodium transporter protein (HKT1), are up-regulated and down-regulated respectively in both Arabidopsis and the ice plant; peroxidase genes exhibit opposite responses. The results of this study provide an important first step towards analyzing environmental tolerance mechanisms in a non-model organism and provide a useful dataset for predicting novel gene functions.
Author Address [Tsukagoshi, Hironaka] Nagoya Univ, Ctr Gene Res, Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. [Tsukagoshi, Hironaka] Nagoya Univ, Program Leading Grad Sch, Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. [Tsukagoshi, Hironaka] JST, PRESTO, Kawaguchi, Saitama, Japan. [Suzuki, Takamasa; Higashiyama, Tetsuya] Nagoya Univ, Div Biol Sci, Grad Sch Sci, Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. [Suzuki, Takamasa; Higashiyama, Tetsuya] Nagoya Univ, JST, ERATO, Higashiyama Live Holon Project,Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. [Nishikawa, Kouki; Ishiguro, Sumie] Nagoya Univ, Grad Sch Bioagr Sci, Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. [Agarie, Sakae] Kagawa Univ, Fac Agr, Takamatsu, Kagawa 760, Japan. [Higashiyama, Tetsuya] Nagoya Univ, WPI ITbM, Chikusa Ku, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. Tsukagoshi, H (reprint author), Nagoya Univ, Ctr Gene Res, Chikusa Ku, Furo Cho, Nagoya, Aichi 46401, Japan. hiroupb@gene.nagoya-u.ac.jp
ISSN 1932-6203
ISBN 1932-6203
29-Character Source Abbreviation PLoS One
Publication Date Feb
Year Published 2015
Volume 10
Issue 2
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1371/journal.pone.0118339
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000350662100171
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed