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Publication Type J
Authors Shirazi, M. U., M. A. Khan, M. Ali, S. M. Mujtaba, S. Mumtaz, M. Ali, B. Khanzada, M. A. Halo, M. Rafique, J. A. Shah, K. A. Jafri and N. Depar
Title Growth performance and nutrient contents of some salt tolerant multipurpose tree species growing under saline environment
Source Pakistan Journal of Botany
Abstract A field study was conducted at NIA experimental farm, Tandojam to observe the growth and nutrients (macro and micro) content of some salt tolerant multipurpose tree species (Acacia ampliceps, Acacia stenophylla, Acacia nilotica, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, and Conocarpus lancifolius) Under Saline environment. The salinity of the soil was varying from medium Saline to very highly saline. The growth performances recorded at 3, 6 and 9 months after transplantation showed that overall survival of all the species tested, was good (70 %). The species Acacia ampliceps had Maximum survival percentage (98.09%) followed by Conocarpus lancifolins (96.82%), Acacia nilotica (96.19 %), Acacia stenophylla (89.52 %), and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (70.47 %). The plant height at 9 months after transplantation was Maximum in Acacia nilotica (200cm), followed by Eucalyptus camaldulensis (190 cm), Acacia ampliceps (127.2 cm), Acacia stenophylla (125.4 cm), and Conocarpus lancifolius (125.1 cm). The leaves samples analyzed for macro & micro-nutrients showed that Acacia nilotica had maximum nitrogen content in leaves, whereas maximum values for potassium were recorded in Acacia stenophylla. While phosphorus content was more, or less similar in all species tested. The data for micro nutrients contents in leaves also showed that native acacia have the maximum zinc, copper and iron contents. It was also observed that Sodium accumulation in plant was negatively related with nitrogen, phosphorus copper. zinc, manganese and iron. The high nutritive values in foliage of native acacia indicate that Acacia nilotica can play an important role in improving the fertility of the soil and can also give good economic returns from the marginal lands.
Author Address [Shirazi, M. U.; Khan, M. A.; Ali, Mukhtiar; Mujtaba, S. M.; Mumtaz, S.; Ali, Muhammad; Khanzada, B.; Halo, M. A.; Rafique, M.; Shah, J. A.; Jafri, K. A.; Depar, N.] Nucl Inst Agr, Plant Physiol Div, Tandojam, Pakistan. Shirazi, MU (reprint author), Nucl Inst Agr, Plant Physiol Div, Tandojam, Pakistan. shirazimu65@hotmail.com
ISSN 0556-3321
ISBN 0556-3321
Publication Date Dec
Year Published 2006
Volume 38
Issue 5
Beginning Page 1381-1388
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000203707400005
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