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Publication Type J
Authors Lutts, S. and I. Lefevre
Title How can we take advantage of halophyte properties to cope with heavy metal toxicity in salt-affected areas?
Source Annals of Botany
Author Keywords Antioxidants glycinebetaine halophytes metal distribution metallothioneins mucilage osmoprotectants phytoextraction phytochelatins phytoremediation phytostabilization ROS scavenging salt marsh species SPECIES KOSTELETZKYA-VIRGINICA HYPERACCUMULATOR THLASPI-CAERULESCENS X-RAY-MICROANALYSIS SESUVIUM-PORTULACASTRUM HALIMIONE-PORTULACOIDES CADMIUM ACCUMULATION ZYGOPHYLLUM-FABAGO SUAEDA-SALSA MESEMBRYANTHEMUM-CRYSTALLINUM PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES
Abstract Background Many areas throughout the world are simultaneously contaminated by high concentrations of soluble salts and by high concentrations of heavy metals that constitute a serious threat to human health. The use of plants to extract or stabilize pollutants is an interesting alternative to classical expensive decontamination procedures. However, suitable plant species still need to be identified for reclamation of substrates presenting a high electrical conductivity. Scope Halophytic plant species are able to cope with several abiotic constraints occurring simultaneously in their natural environment. This review considers their putative interest for remediation of polluted soil in relation to their ability to sequester absorbed toxic ions in trichomes or vacuoles, to perform efficient osmotic adjustment and to limit the deleterious impact of oxidative stress. These physiological adaptations are considered in relation to the impact of salt on heavy metal bioavailabilty in two types of ecosystem: (1) salt marshes and mangroves, and (2) mine tailings in semi-arid areas. Conclusions Numerous halophytes exhibit a high level of heavy metal accumulation and external NaCl may directly influence heavy metal speciation and absorption rate. Maintenance of biomass production and plant water status makes some halophytes promising candidates for further management of heavy-metal-polluted areas in both saline and non-saline environments.
Author Address [Lutts, Stanley; Lefevre, Isabelle] Catholic Univ Louvain, GRPV, Earth & Life Inst Agron ELI A, B-1348 Louvain La Neuve, Belgium. [Lefevre, Isabelle] Biol Ctr CAS, Inst Plant Mol Biol, Ceske Budejovice 37005, Czech Republic. Lutts, S (reprint author), Catholic Univ Louvain, GRPV, Earth & Life Inst Agron ELI A, 4-5 Bte 7-07-13 Pl Croix Sud, B-1348 Louvain La Neuve, Belgium. stanley.lutts@uclouvain.be
ISSN 0305-7364
ISBN 0305-7364
29-Character Source Abbreviation Ann. Bot.
Publication Date Feb
Year Published 2015
Volume 115
Issue 3
Beginning Page 509-528
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1093/aob/mcu264
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000349560400015
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