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Publication Type J
Authors Singh, D., A. K. Buhmann, T. J. Flowers, C. E. Seal and J. Papenbrock
Title Salicornia as a crop plant in temperate regions: selection of genetically characterized ecotypes and optimization of their cultivation conditions
Source Aob Plants
Author Keywords Biomass ETS germination Salicornia species salinity SEED-GERMINATION EUROPAEA L GROWTH IRON DIMORPHISM CHENOPODIACEAE HALOPHYTES STRATEGIES SALINITY CHLORIDE
Abstract Rising sea levels and salinization of groundwater due to global climate change result in fast-dwindling sources of freshwater. Therefore, it is important to find alternatives to grow food crops and vegetables. Halophytes are naturally evolved salt-tolerant plants that are adapted to grow in environments that inhibit the growth of most glycophytic crop plants substantially. Members of the Salicornioideae are promising candidates for saline agriculture due to their high tolerance to salinity. Our aim was to develop genetically characterized lines of Salicornia and Sarcocornia for further breeding and to determine optimal cultivation conditions. To obtain a large and diverse genetic pool, seeds were collected from different countries and ecological conditions. The external transcribed spacer (ETS) sequence of 62 Salicornia and Sarcocornia accessions was analysed: ETS sequence data showed a clear distinction between the two genera and between different Salicornia taxa. However, in some cases the ETS was not sufficiently variable to resolve morphologically distinct species. For the determination of optimal cultivation conditions, experiments on germination, seedling establishment and growth to a harvestable size were performed using different accessions of Salicornia spp. Experiments revealed that the percentage germination was greatest at lower salinities and with temperatures of 20/10 degrees C (day/night). Salicornia spp. produced more harvestable biomass in hydroponic culture than in sand culture, but the nutrient concentration requires optimization as hydroponically grown plants showed symptoms of stress. Salicornia ramosissima produced more harvestable biomass than Salicornia dolichostachya in artificial sea water containing 257 mM NaCl. Based on preliminary tests on ease of cultivation, gain in biomass, morphology and taste, S. dolichostachya was investigated in more detail, and the optimal salinity for seedling establishment was found to be 100 mM. Harvesting of S. dolichostachya twice in a growing season was successful, but the interval between the harvests needs to be optimized to maximize biomass production.
Author Address [Singh, Devesh; Buhmann, Anne K.; Papenbrock, Jutta] Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, D-30419 Hannover, Germany. [Singh, Devesh] Univ Basel, Dept Environm Sci Bot, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland. [Flowers, Tim J.] Univ Sussex, Sch Life Sci, Brighton BN1 9QG, E Sussex, England. [Seal, Charlotte E.] Royal Bot Gardens Kew, Seed Conservat Dept, Ardingly RH17 6TN, W Sussex, England. Papenbrock, J (reprint author), Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, D-30419 Hannover, Germany. Jutta.papenbrock@botanik.uni-hannover.de
ISSN 2041-2851
ISBN 2041-2851
29-Character Source Abbreviation Aob Plants
Year Published 2014
Volume 6
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1093/aobpla/plu071
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000349438600010
Plants associated with this reference

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