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Publication Type J
Authors Dasgupta, N., P. Nandy, C. Sengupta and S. Das
Title Protein and enzymes regulations towards salt tolerance of some Indian mangroves in relation to adaptation
Source Trees-Structure and Function
Abstract Elevated substrate salinity and anthropogenic impulse are the major threat to the mangrove ecosystem. In the Indian subcontinent, Sundarbans have the richest mangrove species diversity. Due to geomorphic characteristics and unplanned management, the elevated salinity prevails in the western part and that has direct impact on vegetation. Seven mangrove taxa were examined, of which four (Aegialitis rotundifolia, Heritiera fomes, Xylocarpus granatum, and X. mekongensis) were considered as degrading and three (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza, Excoecaria agallocha, and Phoenix paludosa) were considered as natural control. The targeted taxa were collected from five different islands and were selected on the basis of increasing salinity gradient. As salinity increased from site I to V (11.76-15.2 ppt), the amount of total leaf proteins decreased in all the targeted species and ranged between 5.67 and 25.23%. The percentage of protein depletion was less in Aegialitis, Heritiera, and Xylocarpus than the other three taxa in higher salinity that pointed out their less adaptability, as degradation of protein may be essential for efficient stress management. Two antioxidative (peroxidase and superoxide dismutase) and two hydrolyzing (acid phosphatase and esterase) enzymes showed a positive correlation with salinity. In four degrading taxa, the percentage of enzyme increment was less than those of their natural control taxa. Salinity imposed increment of antioxidant enzymes facilitate ROS scavenging, which is an inevitable elevated byproduct during photo-inhibition. Lower amount and number of isoforms in higher salinity indicated towards less suitability of Aegialitis rotundifolia, Heritiera fomes, Xylocarpus granatum, and X. mekongensis in increased salinity level of western Sundarbans.
Author Address [Dasgupta, Nirjhar; Das, Sauren] Indian Stat Inst, Agr & Ecol Res Unit, Kolkata 700108, India. [Nandy, Paramita] Barasat Govt Coll, Dept Bot, Kolkata 700124, India. [Sengupta, Chandan] Kalyani Univ, Dept Bot, Kalyani 714235, W Bengal, India. Das, S (reprint author), Indian Stat Inst, Agr & Ecol Res Unit, 203 BT Rd, Kolkata 700108, India. sauren@isical.ac.in
ISSN 0931-1890
ISBN 0931-1890
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2012
Volume 26
Issue 2
Beginning Page 377-391
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s00468-011-0599-x
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000301779200010
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