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Publication Type J
Authors Rozema, E. R., R. J. Gordon and Y. B. Zheng
Title Plant Species for the Removal of Na+ and Cl- from Greenhouse Nutrient Solution
Source Hortscience
Author Keywords constructed wetlands halophytes phytodesalinization water treatment waste-water treatment typha-angustifolia linn. constructed wetlands distichlis-spicata subsurface-flow salinity salt phytoremediation secretion growth
Abstract Certain ions such as Na+ and Cl- can accumulate in recirculating greenhouse nutrient solutions and can reach levels that are damaging to crops. An option for the treatment of this problem is phytoclesalinization with Na+ and Cl- hyperaccumulating plants that could be added to existing water treatment technologies such as constructed wetlands (CWs). Two microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate eight plant species including Atriplex prostrata L. (triangle orache), Distkhlis spicata (L.) Greene (salt grass), Juncus torreyi Coville. (Torrey's rush), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed), Spartina alterniflora Loisel. (smooth cordgrass), Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani (C.C. Gmel.) Palla (softstem bulrush), Typha angustifolia L. (narrow leaf cattail), and Typha latifolia L. (broad leaf cattail) for their Na+ and Cl- accumulation potential. An initial (indoor) experiment determined that J. torreyi, S. tabernaemontani, T. angustifolia, and T. latifolia were the best candidates for phytodesalinization because they had the highest Na+ and Cl- tissue contents after exposure to Na+ and Cl(-)rich nutrient solutions. A second (outdoor) experiment quantified the Na+ and Cl- ion uptake (grams of each ion accumulated per m(2) of microcosm). J. torreyi, S. tabernaemontani, T. angustifolia, and T. latifolia accumulated 5.8, 3.9, 8.3, and 9.2 g.m(-2) of Na+ and 25.7, 18.2, 31.6, and 27.2 g.m(-2) of Cl-, respectively. Of the eight species, T. latifolia and S. tabernaenzontani showed the greatest potential to accumulate Na+ and Cl- in a CW environment, whereas S. alterniflora, D. spicata, and P. australis showed the least potential.
Author Address [Rozema, Eric R.; Gordon, Robert J.] Univ Guelph, Sch Environm Sci, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada. [Zheng, Youbin] Vineland Res & Innovat Ctr, Vineland Stn, ON L0R 2E0, Canada. Zheng, YB (reprint author), Vineland Res & Innovat Ctr, 4890 Victoria Ave North,Box 4000, Vineland Stn, ON L0R 2E0, Canada. yzheng@uoguelph.ca
ISSN 0018-5345
ISBN 0018-5345
29-Character Source Abbreviation Hortscience
Publication Date Aug
Year Published 2014
Volume 49
Issue 8
Beginning Page 1071-1075
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000341407100016
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