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Publication Type J
Authors Adu, A. A., A. R. Yeo and O. T. Okusanya
Title THE RESPONSE TO SALINITY OF A POPULATION OF DACTYLOCTENIUM-AEGYPTIUM FROM A SALINE HABITAT IN SOUTHERN NIGERIA
Source Journal of Tropical Ecology
Author Keywords dactyloctenium-aegyptium nigeria salinity
Abstract The effects of salinity upon the growth, photosynthesis, ion and water contents of a population of Dactyloctenium aegyptium originating from a saline site in Nigeria were investigated. Growth was unaffected by a salinity of 10% artificial sea water, but was reduced by one third in 20% and by two thirds in 30% artificial sea water respectively. Initial adjustment to salinity was due both to increases in the concentrations of sodium and potassium per unit dry weight and to reduced hydration, the latter being the more important at higher salinities. The increase in ion concentration in the cell sap balanced the salinity of the medium at 10% artificial sea water, but was excessive at higher concentrations of sea water. Net photosynthesis was unaffected by 10% artificial sea water but declined at higher salinities. The potassium content of the plants did not fall below 200-250 mM, and the sodium to potassium ratio did not exceed three, even at the highest salinities. Variation in the concentration of nutrients (potassium, nitrate and sulphate) in the medium in the presence of 23% artificial sea water had significant effects upon growth, but these were small in relation to the inhibitory effect of the salinity. The reduction in growth could not be attributed to lack of osmotic adjustment or to nutrient deficiency, and was probably due to ion toxicity within the leaves. The tolerance to reduced hydration, combined with the ability to germinate in saline conditions previously observed, could enable D. aegyptium to establish in a saline soil. The population did not exhibit any halophytic characteristics but did survive with a low growth rate at salinities up to 50% artificial sea water. It is concluded that the species was able to colonize the saline site because of its inherent adaptability, rather than the possession of an ecotype adapted to saline conditions.
Author Address ADU, AA (reprint author), UNIV LAGOS,DEPT BIOL SCI,LAGOS,NIGERIA, NIGERIA
ISSN 0266-4674
ISBN 0266-4674
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Trop. Ecol.
Publication Date May
Year Published 1994
Volume 10
Beginning Page 219-228
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1994NP96600007
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