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Publication Type J
Authors Wided, M. K., C. Feten, M. Rawya, M. Feten, Z. Yosr, T. Nejla, K. Riadh, N. Emira and A. Chedly
Title Antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of Frankenia thymifolia Desf. fractions and their related biomolecules identification by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)
Source Journal of Medicinal Plants Research
Author Keywords Biological activities fatty acid Frankenia thymifolia phenolic fractionation high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) algerian medicinal-plants trans-cinnamic acid in-vitro phenolic-acids fatty-acids antibacterial activity extraction solvents tea polyphenols salicylic-acid salt stress
Abstract Frankenia thymifolia Desf. is an endemic xero-halophyte species common in the salted and arid region of Tunisia. In this study, two kinds of Frankenia shoot fractions were assessed on their polyphenol contents and biological activities. Then, the main phenolic and fatty acid compositions were identified. Results showed that polar fraction contains a highest polyphenol, flavonoid and tannin contents (14.2 mg GAE g(-1) DW, 4.8 and 4.6 mg CE g(-1) DW, respectively). The higher phenolic content in this fraction reflect the best total antioxidant capacity (8.8 mg GAE g(-1) DW), antiradical activity, beta-carotene bleaching and Fe-reducing tests with the lowest IC(50) and EC(50) values as compared to apolar fraction. However, chloroformic fraction was more efficient against pathogen strains. In fact, this fraction was active against all strains. Whereas, polar extract exhibited slight and moderate antibacterial activity (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, respectively). The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that salicylic and transcinnamic acids were the major phenolics. The major fatty acids were palmitic, elaidic and linoleic acids. Such variability in antioxidant and antimicrobial capacities between the two fractions can be explained by different bioactive compounds contain in each fraction and might be of great importance in terms of valorizing this halophyte as a source of bioactive molecules for cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.
Author Address [Wided, MK; Feten, C; Rawya, M; Feten, M; Nejla, T; Riadh, K; Chedly, A] Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [Yosr, Z] INSAT, Lab Biotechnol Vegetale, Tunis 1080, Tunisia. [Emira, N] Fac Pharm, Dept Microbiol, Lab Anal Traitement & Valorisat Polluants Environ, Monastir, Tunisia. [Emira, N] Univ Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia. Wided, MK (reprint author), Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia ksouriwided@yahoo.fr
ISSN 1996-0875
ISBN 1996-0875
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Med. Plants Res.
Publication Date Oct
Year Published 2011
Volume 5
Issue 24
Beginning Page 5754-5765
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000297461300015
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