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Publication Type J
Authors Toderich, K. N., E. V. Shuyskaya, S. Ismail, L. G. Gismatullina, T. Radjabov, B. B. Bekchanov and D. B. Aralova
Title PHYTOGENIC RESOURCES OF HALOPHYTES OF CENTRAL ASIA AND THEIR ROLE FOR REHABILITATION OF SANDY DESERT DEGRADED RANGELANDS
Source Land Degradation & Development
Abstract Based on soil characteristics, watertable level, mineral composition of plant biomass, morphological/reproductive traits and carbon discrimination values, a new concept for the classification of halophytes was developed. Six main groups of halophytes have been described within the desert flora of Central Asia. Significant changes on chemical contents of ions: Cl(-), SO(4)(2-), HCO(3)(-), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) among 23 studied halophytic rage species were revealed. Alhagi pseudoalhagi, Poaceae spp Artemisia diffusa containing minimum concentration of mineral ions were categorised as relatively more palatable and valuable feed for livestock on open grazing and as hay. Fresh biomass of forage species growing under highly saline soils sharply decreased with increasing of salinity gradient. Potassium concentration was found highest in Kochia scoparia, Agropyron desertorum, closely followed by Atriplex nitens, Suaeda salsa, while annuals Salsola spp., Bromus tectorum, Aeluropus littoralis, Tamarix hispida, Eremopyrum orientale, Agropyron desertorum contain low amount of mineral ions because excess of salts are exuded through salt glands present abundantly on the surface of the epidermis. Native and exotic, both C(3) and C(4), halophytes are suitable For reclamation of degraded lands have been proven very useful in demonstration trials. The fresh biomass of investigated C3 plants sharply decreased with the increasing of soil salinity gradient. An integrated Biosaline Agriculture model for sustainable and integrated use of marginal mineralised water resources and salt-affected soils through involvement of food-feed salt/drought tolerant crops and forage legumes to improve food security, alleviate poverty and enhance ecosystem health in smallholder crop-livestock systems has been demonstrated. Copyright (C) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Author Address [Toderich, K. N.; Gismatullina, L. G.; Radjabov, T.; Aralova, D. B.] Acad Sci Uzbek, Dept Desert Ecol & Water Resources Res, Samarkand Div, Samarkand 703000, Uzbekistan. [Toderich, K. N.; Ismail, S.] ICBA, Dubai, U Arab Emirates. [Shuyskaya, E. V.] Russian Acad Sci, KA Timiryazev Plant Physiol Inst, Moscow 127276, Russia. [Bekchanov, B. B.] Uzbek Inst Karakul Sheep Breeding & Desert Ecol R, Samarkand 703054, Uzbekistan. Toderich, KN (reprint author), Acad Sci Uzbek, Dept Desert Ecol & Water Resources Res, Samarkand Div, 3 Timur Malik Str, Samarkand 703000, Uzbekistan. k.toderich@cgiar.org
ISSN 1085-3278
ISBN 1085-3278
Publication Date Jul-Aug
Year Published 2009
Volume 20
Issue 4
Beginning Page 386-396
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1002/ldr.936
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000268659700003
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