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Publication Type J
Authors Suarez, N.
Title Effects of short- and long-term salinity on leaf water relations, gas exchange, and growth in Ipomoea pes-caprae
Source Flora
Author Keywords Coastal habitats Halophytes Osmotic adjustment Salt tolerance Xylem sap osmolality salt tolerance photosynthetic responses seed-germination sodium-chloride coastal dunes plants halophytes stress ion accumulation
Abstract Ipomoea pes-caprae is widespread in pantropical coastal areas along the beach. The aim of this study was to investigate the salinity tolerance level and physiological mechanisms that allow I. pes-caprae to endure abrupt increases in salinity under brief or prolonged exposure to salinity variations. Xylem sap osmolality (X-osm), leaf water relations, gas exchange, and number of produced and dead leaves were measured at short- (1-7 d) and long- (22-46 d) term after a sudden increase in soil salinity of 0, 85, 170, and 255 mM NaCl. In the short-term, X-osm was not affected by salinity, but in the long-term there was a significant increase in plants grown in presence of salt compared with control plants. After salt addition, the plants showed osmotic stress with temporal cell turgor loss. However, the water potential gradient for water uptake was re-established at 4, 7 and 22 d after salt addition, at 85, 170 and 255 mM NaCl, respectively. In the short-term I. pes-caprae was able to tolerate salinities of up to 255 mM NaCl without significant reduction in carbon assimilation or growth. With the duration of stress, leaf ion concentration continued to increase and reached toxic levels at high salinity with a progressive decrease in photosynthetic rate, reduced leaf formation and accelerated senescence. Then, if high levels of soil salts from tidal inundation occur for short periods, the survival of I. pes-caprae is possible, but prolonged exposure to salinity may induce metabolic damage and reduce drastically the plant growth. (C) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.
Author Address Univ Simon Bolivar, Dept Biol Organismos, Caracas 1080A, Venezuela. Suarez, N, Univ Simon Bolivar, Dept Biol Organismos, Apartado 89 000, Caracas 1080A, Venezuela. natsuare@usb.ve
ISSN 0367-2530
ISBN 0367-2530
29-Character Source Abbreviation Flora
Year Published 2011
Volume 206
Issue 3
Beginning Page 267-275
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.flora.2010.05.006
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000289708300013
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