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Publication Type J
Authors Sanchez, D. H., F. L. Pieckenstain, F. Escaray, A. Erban, U. Kraemer, M. K. Udvardi and J. Kopka
Title Comparative ionomics and metabolomics in extremophile and glycophytic Lotus species under salt stress challenge the metabolic pre-adaptation hypothesis
Source Plant Cell and Environment
Author Keywords Lotus creticus halophyte ionome legume metabolome salt acclimation salt stress creticus-creticus plants induced potassium efflux functional genomics salinity tolerance gas-chromatography compatible solutes water relations japonicus halophytes mechanisms
Abstract The legume genus Lotus includes glycophytic forage crops and other species adapted to extreme environments, such as saline soils. Understanding salt tolerance mechanisms will contribute to the discovery of new traits which may enhance the breeding efforts towards improved performance of legumes in marginal agricultural environments. Here, we used a combination of ionomic and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolite profilings of complete shoots (pooling leaves, petioles and stems) to compare the extremophile Lotus creticus, adapted to highly saline coastal regions, and two cultivated glycophytic grassland forage species, Lotus corniculatus and Lotus tenuis. L. creticus exhibited better survival after exposure to long-term lethal salinity and was more efficient at excluding Cl- from the shoots than the glycophytes. In contrast, Na+ levels were higher in the extremophile under both control and salt stress, a trait often observed in halophytes. Ionomics demonstrated a differential rearrangement of shoot nutrient levels in the extremophile upon salt exposure. Metabolite profiling showed that responses to NaCl in L. creticus shoots were globally similar to those of the glycophytes, providing little evidence for metabolic pre-adaptation to salinity. This study is the first comparing salt acclimation responses between extremophile and non-extremophile legumes, and challenges the generalization of the metabolic salt pre-adaptation hypothesis.
Author Address [Sanchez, Diego H.; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim] Max Planck Inst Mol Plant Physiol, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany. [Pieckenstain, Fernando L.; Escaray, Francisco] Inst Tecnol Chascomus UNSAM CONICET, Inst Invest Biotecnol, Chascomus, Argentina. [Kraemer, Ute] Ruhr Univ Bochum, Dept Plant Physiol, D-44801 Bochum, Germany. [Udvardi, Michael K.] Samuel Roberts Noble Fdn Inc, Ardmore, OK 73401 USA. Kopka, J, Max Planck Inst Mol Plant Physiol, Wissensch Pk Golm,Am Muhlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany. kopka@mpimp-golm.mpg.de
ISSN 0140-7791
ISBN 0140-7791
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Cell Environ.
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2011
Volume 34
Issue 4
Beginning Page 605-617
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2010.02266.x
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000288218700006
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