Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Rabhi, M., N. Karray-Bouraoui, R. Medini, H. Attia, H. U. R. Athar, C. Abdelly and A. Smaoui
Title Seasonal variations in phytodesalination capacity of two perennial halophytes in their natural biotope
Source Journal of Biological Research-Thessaloniki
Author Keywords desalination Suaeda fruticosa Tecticornia indica productivity sodium accumulation soil properties saline-sodic soil physical-properties amelioration strategies tolerance growth plants phytoremediation reclamation gypsum
Abstract In Soliman sabkha (NE Tunisia), Tecticornia indica and Suaeda fruticosa tufts were divided into three size classes (small, medium, and big) in which the shoot sodium and potassium contents were determined in July 2007 and February 2008. Shoot dry weights per tuft and per hectare were estimated. Soil samples (20 upper centimeters) were taken from inside and outside the halophyte tufts and analyzed for electrical conductivity (EC1/10) and soluble sodium content. We found that these two parameters were significantly lower in the soil from inside the tufts than in the surrounding soil. This effect was more pronounced in winter (February 2008) when EC1/10 inside halophyte tufts was 63 to 72% lower than outside. In July 2007, the relevant reduction of EC1/10 inside the tufts was 55%. Soluble sodium content was reduced by 70.5% in winter and only 31 to 37% in summer. The ecosystem productivity was about 8.6 tonnes dry weight per hectare (t DW ha(-1)) with higher sodium than potassium contents (about 0.646 t Na+ ha(-1) in summer and 0.752 tonnes Na+ ha(-1) in winter). Regardless of the season, T. indica exhibited much higher phytodesalination capacity (77.7-94.4% of the whole shoot-removed sodium). For S. fruticosa, the decrease in soil salinity was due to roots that released sodium ions from the exchange sites and facilitated their leaching to the deeper horizons. From an ecological point of view, phytodesalination and sodium leaching enhancement are interesting processes since they provide glycophytes with a microhabitat suitable for their development, which maintains the biodiversity within the saline ecosystem.
Author Address [Rabhi, Mokded; Abdelly, Chedly; Smaoui, Abderrazak] Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [Karray-Bouraoui, Najoua; Medini, Refka; Attia, Houneida] Fac Sci Tunis, Dept Biol, Unite Physiol & Biochim Tolerance Sel Plantes, Tunis 1060, Tunisia. [Athar, Habib-ur-Rehman] Bahauddin Zakariya Univ, Inst Pure & Appl Biol, Multan, Pakistan. Rabhi, M, Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. mokdedrabhi@yahoo.fr
ISSN 1790-045X
ISBN 1790-045X
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Biol. Res.
Year Published 2010
Volume 14
Beginning Page 181-189
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000281968800005
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed