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Publication Type J
Authors Park, J., T. W. Okita and G. E. Edwards
Title Salt tolerant mechanisms in single-cell C-4 species Bienertia sinuspersici and Suaeda aralocaspica (Chenopodiaceae)
Source Plant Science
Author Keywords Bienertia sinuspersici Glycine betaine Halophytes Salt tolerance Single-cell C-4 Suaeda aralocaspica GLYCINE BETAINE CYCLOPTERA CHENOPODIACEAE KRANZ ANATOMY SUGAR-BEET STRESS ARABIDOPSIS PLANTS DIFFERENTIATION PHOTOSYNTHESIS CHOLINE
Abstract Suaeda aralocaspica and Bienertia sinuspersici (Chenopodiaceae), which have unusual mechanisms Of C-4 photosynthesis by dimorphic chloroplasts within individual chlorenchyma cells, grow in saline semi-arid desert regions in Central Asia and around the Persian Gulf. Their response to salinity was studied, along with those of the related C-3 Suaeda heterophylla and Kranz (dual cell) type C-4 Suaeda eltonica in subfamily Suaedoideae. Light response curves for CO2 fixation with salt treatment (200 mM NaCl) indicated these species have high tolerance to salinity. All accumulated glycine betaine (GB) which is known to protect against abiotic stress. Western blots showed that the protein levels of choline monooxygenase (CMO) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH), enzymes catalyzing synthesis of GB from choline, increased under salt stress in both single-cell type C-4 species. Their cDNAs for CMO and BADH were isolated, sequenced and phylogenetic analyses showed that CMO for both species, and BADH for B. sinuspersici, are in a clade in subfamily Suaedoideae. Results of in situ immunolocalization experiments with BADH antibody show that both chloroplast types in the single-cell C-4 species and in the Kranz type C-4 S. eltonica function in GB synthesis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis showed B. sinuspersici has very prominent salt glands, which accumulate sodium chloride under salt stress, while S. aralocaspica lacks salt glands. The bases for salt tolerance in these species are discussed considering anatomical and biochemical features. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Park, Joonho; Edwards, Gerald E.] Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA. [Okita, Thomas W.] Washington State Univ, Inst Biol Chem, Pullman, WA 99164 USA. Edwards, GE, Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA. edwardsg@wsu.edu
ISSN 0168-9452
ISBN 0168-9452
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Sci.
Publication Date May
Year Published 2009
Volume 176
Issue 5
Beginning Page 616-626
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plantsci.2009.01.014
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000264916800004
Plants associated with this reference

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