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Publication Type J
Authors Morzaria-Luna, H., J. C. Callaway, G. Sullivan and J. B. Zedler
Title Relationship between topographic heterogeneity and vegetation patterns in a Californian salt marsh
Source Journal of Vegetation Science
Author Keywords coastal wetland sampling scale species assemblage tidal creek san-francisco bay spatial-pattern plant zonation soil aeration restoration communities disturbance halophyte diversity salinity
Abstract Questions: Are species richness and species abundances higher in the presence of tidal creeks? Do species richness and species abundances vary with plot size? Location: Intertidal plain of Volcano Marsh, Bahia de San Quintin, Mexico. Methods: We analysed vegetation patterns in large areas (cells) with tidal creeks (+creek) and without (-creek). We surveyed vegetation cover, microtopography, habitat type, and distance to creeks in nested plots of five sizes, 0.1, 0.25, 1, 2.5, and 10 m(2). Results: Species richness, frequency, cover, and assemblages differed between creek cells. Richness tended to be higher in +creek cells, and cover and frequency of individual species differed significantly between creek cells. We found consistent patterns in vegetation structure across plot sizes. We encountered 13 species that occurred in 188 unique assemblages. The most common assemblage had six species: Batis maritima. Frankenia salina, Salicornia bigelovii, S. virginica, Salicornia spec. and Triglochin concinna. This assemblage occurred in creek cells and at all spatial scales. Of the most common assemblages all but one were composed of multiple species (3-9 species/plot). Conclusions: The persistence of vegetation patterns across a 100-fold range in spatial scale suggests that similar environmental factors operate broadly to determine species establishment and persistence. Differences in assemblage composition result from variation of frequency and cover of marsh plain species, particularly Suaeda esteroa and Monanthochloe littoralis. The recommendation for restoration of Californian salt marshes is to target (and plant) multi-species assemblages, not monocultures.
Author Address Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bot, Madison, WI 53706 USA Wetlands Initiat, Chicago, IL 60604 USA Univ San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117 USA Zedler, JB (reprint author), Univ Wisconsin, Dept Bot, Madison, WI 53706 USA morzarialuna@wisc.edu callaway@usfca.edu gsullivan@wetlands-initiative.org jbzedler@wisc.edu
ISSN 1100-9233
ISBN 1100-9233
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Veg. Sci.
Publication Date Aug
Year Published 2004
Volume 15
Issue 4
Beginning Page 523-530
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1658/1100-9233(2004)015[0523:rbthav]2.0.co;2
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000222501400010
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