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Publication Type J
Authors Lee, R. W.
Title Physiological adaptations of the invasive cordgrass Spartina anglica to reducing sediments: rhizome metabolic gas fluxes and enhanced O-2 and H2S transport
Source Marine Biology
Author Keywords salt-marsh; aerenchyma development; sulfide concentration; alterniflora roots; hydrogen-sulfide; nitrogen uptake; oxygen; responses; patens; tolerance
Abstract Cordgrasses of the genus Spartina form dense monospecific stands worldwide, profoundly influencing the ecology of estuaries. One species, Spartina anglica, originated by allopolyploidy in the 1800s and has been particularly prolific as an invasive species worldwide. S. anglica tolerates low- lying estuarine mudflats that its progenitor species and other coastal halophytes cannot. However, very little is known of the physiology of S. anglica. In the present study, an automated flow-through respirometry system was used to quantify metabolic gas fluxes (O-2, H2S, CO2, and NH3) of S. anglica rhizomes. Enhanced physiological mechanisms to transport O-2 and H2S in both directions between the rhizosphere and the atmosphere were exhibited by S. anglica, but not by the native North American species S. alterniflora. These results suggest that tolerance of anoxia and H2S may assist S. anglica in colonizing extensively flooded environments. Enhanced sediment oxygenation by S. anglica may be potentially useful for phytoremediation of contaminated sediments, since microbial degradation of organic pollutants is often limited by O-2 availability.
Author Address Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA Lee RW Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA
29-Character Source Abbreviation Mar. Biol.
Publication Date Jul
Year Published 2003
Volume 143
Issue 1
Beginning Page 9-15
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000184026900002
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