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Publication Type J
Authors Keiffer, C. H. and I. A. Ungar
Title The effect of competition and edaphic conditions on the establishment of halophytes on brine effected soils
Source Wetlands Ecology and Management
Author Keywords Salinity Atriplex, halophytes, Hordeum, Salicornia, Spergularia, Suaeda
Abstract In order to test the feasibility of using native halophytes to reclaim brine contaminated soil, seedlings of five inland halophytes, Atriplex prostrata, Hordeum jubatum, Salicornia europaea, Spergularia marina, and Suaeda calceoliformis, were planted at three densities on a site near Athens, Ohio which had been contaminated by oil well brine water. Ten replicates of each density treatment were transplanted on two distinct areas of high and low salinity in May of 1993. Seedling survivorship, soil moisture, and soil salinity were monitored weekly throughout the growing season. Biomass production and ion uptake were determined for each plant surviving until harvest. Soil analyses were performed prior to planting and after harvest to determine overall changes in soil chemistry and to determine the amount of Na+ reduction from the soil due to leaching by precipitation during the course of the experiment. Survival was determined to be density independent for all of the species with the exception of S. marina where survival was facilitated at high density. Increased salinity negatively affected the survival and yield of A. prostrata. The remaining species had greater survival under high salinity conditions, and density appeared to be the key factor influencing yield. Sodium and chloride ions were accumulated in plant tissues in much greater amounts than K+, Ca+2 or Mg+2. Salicornia europaea plants grown in high density on the high salinity site accumulated the highest amount of Na+ and H. jubatum grown in low density on the high salinity site accumulated the lowest amount of Na+. Soil salinities measured directly from the root zone were significantly reduced (p <0.05) at the end of the growing season when compared to their controls. Atriplex prostrata (high density/low salinity) plots produced the greatest reduction in soil salinity (15.8%) and S. marina (high density/high salinity) plots had the least reduction (1.2%).
Year Published 2001
Volume 9
Beginning Page 469-481
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