Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Karagatzides, J. D. and I. Hutchinson
Title INTRASPECIFIC COMPARISONS OF BIOMASS DYNAMICS IN SCIRPUS-AMERICANUS AND SCIRPUS-MARITIMUS ON THE FRASER-RIVER DELTA
Source Journal of Ecology
Author Keywords spartina-alterniflora salt-marsh brackish marsh carex-lyngbyei growth form allocation reproduction halophytes vegetation plasticity
Abstract (1) The relative magnitudes of environmental vs. genetic influences on the growth of Scirpus americanus and Scirpus maritimus were examined in an intertidal marsh on the Fraser River Delta, British Columbia. Intraspecific comparisons at the high and low parts of an elevational gradient were made for shoot, inflorescence, root, rhizome and corm mass over a 16-month period. (2) S. americanus plants on the high marsh bad greater shoot densities, flowering frequencies, above- and below-ground masses than plants growing on the low marsh. Shoot density of S. maritimus was highest on the low marsh but its flowering frequency, and above- and below-ground masses were greatest on the high marsh. At all sites sampled, vegetative reproductive effort exceeded sexual reproductive effort; within each species, total reproductive effort on the high marsh exceeded that measured on the low marsh. (3) Shoot growth rates were calculated after controlling for below-ground mass and the duration of tidal exposure. For both species, low-marsh stands had higher shoot growth rates per gram below-ground mass per hour of tidal exposure than high-marsh stands, but shoot mass m-2 was greatest on the high marsh. Enhanced plant mass on the high marsh is associated with larger below-ground reserves, but is ultimately a product of prolonged aerial exposure. (4) Reciprocal field-transplant experiments indicated that the high- and low-marsh populations of S. americanus and S. maritimus consist of different genotypes which show similar phenotypes when grown in a common environment. Genotypes moved into new environments grew as well as the residents, suggesting that there is no local genetic differentiation.
Author Address SIMON FRASER UNIV,DEPT GEOG,BURNABY V5A 1S6,BC,CANADA
ISSN 0022-0477
ISBN 0022-0477
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Ecol.
Publication Date Jun
Year Published 1991
Volume 79
Issue 2
Beginning Page 459-476
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.2307/2260726
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1991GX79600015
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed