Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Ibrahim, A. H.
Title Tolerance and avoidance responses to salinity and water stresses in Calotropis procera and Suaeda aegyptiaca
Source Turkish Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Author Keywords Amino acids Calotropis drought leaf shedding osmotic pressure proline salinity Suaeda waterlogging leaf gas-exchange salt tolerance higher-plants amino-acids metabolism wheat halophytes cultivars growth na+
Abstract This study was designed to evaluate the response of 2 wild shrubs, Calotropis procera and Suaeda aegyptiaca, to salinity (100% seawater), drought, and waterlogging stresses. The 90-day-old plants were subjected to the stress treatments for 3 weeks, and growth and some physiological parameters were evaluated. The total plant dry mass of C. procera plants was reduced by 40%, whereas S. aegyptiaca was not significantly affected by salinity stress. Water deficit and waterlogging stresses significantly reduced the total dry mass of both species. Under all conditions, the root/shoot ratio in C. procera was 3-fold higher than in S. aegyptiaca. All applied stresses markedly increased leaf shedding in C. procera plants only. These plants appeared to have a higher salinity and waterlogging stress intensity index as manifested by chlorophyll levels lower than those in S. aegyptiaca. Under all conditions, Na+ levels of S. aegyptiaca were twice those of C. procera plants. All stresses reduced the K+/Na+ ratio in C. procera leaves. On the other hand, S. aegyptiaca plants were able to maintain this ratio near control levels under salinity and drought stresses. Consequently, S. aegyptiaca leaves had higher partial osmotic pressure than C. procera. The proline and total free amino acids levels in C. procera were between 1.3- and 2-fold higher than in S. aegyptiaca. Among all amino acids, the common change in both species under all stresses was an accumulation of free proline and a decrease in methionine levels. The results revealed that the response of both species to salinity and water stresses included avoidance and tolerance mechanisms with some differences between them.
Author Address [Ibrahim, Ali Hassan] Umm Al Qura Univ, Univ Coll, Al Qunfida, Saudi Arabia. [Ibrahim, Ali Hassan] Suez Canal Univ, Fac Educ, Dept Biol Sci, Al Arish, North Sinai, Egypt. Ibrahim, AH (reprint author), Umm Al Qura Univ, Univ Coll, Al Qunfida, Saudi Arabia. ibrahim2910@yahoo.com
ISSN 1300-011X
ISBN 1300-011X
29-Character Source Abbreviation Turk. J. Agric. For.
Year Published 2013
Volume 37
Issue 3
Beginning Page 352-360
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3906/tar-1202-62
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000321226800012
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed