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Publication Type J
Authors Glenn, E. P., S. G. Nelson, B. Ambrose, R. Martinez, D. Soliz, V. Pabendinskas and K. Hultine
Title Comparison of salinity tolerance of three Atriplex spp. in well-watered and drying soils
Source Environmental and Experimental Botany
Abstract Members of the Chenopodiaceae are well adapted to both salt and drought stress and can serve as model species to understand the mechanisms of tolerance in plants. We grew Atriplex hortensis (ATHO), A. canescens (ATCA), and A. lentiformis (ATLE) along a NaCL salinity gradient under non-water-limited conditions and in drying soils in greenhouse experiments. The species differed in photosynthetic carbon fixation pathway, capacity for sodium uptake, and habitat preferences. Under non-water-limited conditions, ATLE (C4) maintained high growth rates up to 30 g L-1 NaCl. ATHO (C3) had lower growth than ATLE at high salinities, while ATCA (C4) grew more slowly than either ATLE or ATHO and showed no net growth above 20 g L-1 NaCl. ATHO and ATLE accumulated twice as much sodium in their shoots as ATCA, but all three species had increasing sodium levels at higher salinities. Potassium, magnesium and calcium levels were relatively constant over the salinity gradient. All three species showed marked accumulation of chloride across the salinity gradient, whereas nitrate, phosphorous and sulfate decreased with salinity. The effect of drought was simulated by growing plants in sealed pots with an initial charge of water plus NaCl, and allowing them to grow to the end point at which they no longer were able to extract water from the soil solution. Drought and salinity were not additive stress factors for Atriplex spp. in this experiment. NaCl increased their ability to extract water from the soil solution compared to fresh water controls. ATLE showed increased shoot dry matter production and increased water use efficiency (WUE) as initial salinity levels increased from 0 to 30 g L-1 NaCl, whereas dry matter production and WUE peaked at 5 g for ATHO and ATCA. Final soil moisture salinities tolerated by species were 85 gL(-1), 55 gL(-1) and 160 gL(-1) NaCl for ATHO, ATCA and ATLE, respectively. C4 photosynthesis and sodium accumulation in shoots were associated with high drought and salt tolerance. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
ISSN 0098-8472
ISBN 0098-8472
Publication Date Nov
Year Published 2012
Volume 83
Beginning Page 62-72
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2012.04.010
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000305767500007
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