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Publication Type J
Authors Glagoleva, T. A. and M. V. Chulanovskaya
Title Photosynthetic metabolism and assimilate translocation in C-4 halophytes inhabiting the Ararat valley
Source Russian Journal of Plant Physiology
Author Keywords chenopodiaceae/salt stress/halophytes/photosynthetic metabolism/assimilate transport/LEAVES/SALINITY/GROWTH/BARLEY
Abstract Photosynthetic capacity, products of photosynthetic metabolism, and C-14-assimilate translocation were examined in several C-4 halophytes inhabiting the Ararat Valley. Plants exposed to various soil salinities in their natural habitats significantly differed in their photosynthetic and assimilate translocation rates. A strong negative correlation was found between the rate of assimilate export from leaves and Cl- content in leaves. In plants with high assimilation rates, radioactivity losses associated with assimilate export from leaves were comparable to respiratory losses of C-14, whereas the contribution of translocation to the loss of leaf radioactivity was significantly smaller in plants with low assimilation rates. Assimilate translocation within the leaf was suppressed by salt stress to a greater extent than photosynthesis. In a plant species growing at high salinity (Climacoptera crassa), starch biosynthesis was inhibited, and a larger proportion of C-14 was incorporated into amino acids and organic acids, particularly alanine and malate, the substances that are the principal assimilates transported along with sucrose. Being osmotically active compounds, amino acids and organic acids play an important role in the fast metabolic regulation that maintains the plant water status. Osmoregulatory mechanisms enable plants to maintain a positive carbon balance under conditions of salt stress, despite low rates of photosynthesis and assimilate transport.
ISSN 1021-4437
ISBN 1021-4437
Year Published 1996
Volume 43
Issue 3
Beginning Page 349-357
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