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Publication Type J
Authors Falleh, H., I. Jalleli, R. Ksouri, M. Boulaaba, S. Guyot, C. Magne and C. Abdelly
Title Effect of salt treatment on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of two Mesembryanthemum edule provenances
Source Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Author Keywords Antioxidant activity Phenolic composition Salt treatment Halophyte Salt tolerance stress capacity root procyanidins tolerance leaves fruits leaf l.
Abstract Mesembryanthemum edule L is an edible and medicinal halophyte widespread in Tunisia seashore. In this study, parameters of oxidative stress, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were comparatively investigated in two M. edule provenances (Jerba and Bizerte, respectively sampled from arid and humid bioclimatic stages). Plants were subjected to 0, 300 and 600 mM NaCl treatment under glasshouse conditions. Results showed that M. edule response to salinity depends on provenance (P), salt treatment (T) and their interaction (P x T). (T) affected more significantly the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant activities than (P) and (P x T). Conversely, (P) was much affluent for tannin polymerization degree and interaction between the two factors (P x T) was more determinants for analyzed antioxidant parameters. The higher salt tolerance of Jerba plants was associated with low levels of malondialdehyde and of electrolyte leakage mainly at 600 mM NaCl. Besides, antioxidant activities of Jerba provenance, were more efficient than Bizerte. In addition, avicularin was the major phenolic in both provenances. This compound concentration increased with salinity in Jerba shoots, while it was reduced in Bizerte especially at 600 mM NaCl. Overall, the higher salt tolerance of plants from Jerba provenance, and to a lower extent of those from Bizerte, may be partly related to their better capacity to limit oxidative damage when salt-challenged, and this is likely the result of redistribution in phenolic composition. Besides, abiotic factors such as salinity could be determinant in antioxidant potentiality of this medicinal plant. (C) 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Falleh, Hanen; Jalleli, Ines; Ksouri, Riadh; Boulaaba, Mondher; Abdelly, Chedly] Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [Falleh, Hanen; Magne, Christian] Univ Brest, EA LEBHAM 3877, IUEM, F-29280 Plouzane, France. [Guyot, Sylvain] INRA, Unite Rech Cidricoles Biotransformat Fruits & Leg, F-35653 Le Rheu, France. Falleh, H (reprint author), Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Plantes Extremophiles, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia hanenfalleh@gmail.com
ISSN 0981-9428
ISBN 0981-9428
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Physiol. Biochem.
Publication Date Mar
Year Published 2012
Volume 52
Beginning Page 1-8
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plaphy.2011.11.001
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000301758000001
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