Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.20
or
Publication Type J
Authors Duarte, B., D. Santos, J. C. Marques and I. Cacador
Title Ecophysiological adaptations of two halophytes to salt stress: Photosynthesis, PS II photochemistry and anti-oxidant feedback - Implications for resilience in climate change
Source Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Author Keywords Salt stress Halophytes Photosynthesis Pigments Oxidative stress PSII photochemistry modulated pam fluorometry photosystem-ii singlet oxygen chlorophyll fluorescence electron-transport xanthophyll cycle water relations defense system in-vivo salinity
Abstract Halimione portulacoides and Sarcocomia fruticosa commonly exhibit a reddish coloration especially in high evaporation periods, due to betacyanin production in response to stress. Although sharing the same area in salt marshes, they present different strategies to overcome salinity stress. While S. fruticosa present a dilution strategy, increasing succulence, H. portulacoides appears to have developed an ionic compartmentalization strategy. Nevertheless, there's still a decrease in the photosynthetic activity in different extents. While in S. fruticosa, the impairment of photosynthetic activity is due to a decrease in the flow from the electron transport chain to the quinone pool; in H. portulacoides the process is affected far more early, with high amounts of energy dissipated at the PSII light harvesting centers. This photosynthetic impairment leads to energy accumulation and consequently to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). SOD was particularly active in stressed individuals, although this increment is rather more significant in S. fruticosa than in H. portulacoides suggesting that H. portulacoides may have a maximum salt concentration at which can sustain cellular balance between ROS production and scavenging. These different ecophysiological responses have great importance while evaluating the impacts climate change driven increase of sediment salinity on halophyte physiology and on the marsh community and ecosystem services. (C) 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
Author Address Univ Lisbon CO, Fac Sci, Ctr Oceanog, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. Univ Coimbra, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Zool, Inst Marine Res,Marine & Environm Res Ctr IMAR CM, P-3000 Coimbra, Portugal. Duarte, B (reprint author), Univ Lisbon CO, Fac Sci, Ctr Oceanog, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. baduarte@fc.ul.pt
ISSN 0981-9428
ISBN 0981-9428
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Physiol. Biochem.
Publication Date Jun
Year Published 2013
Volume 67
Beginning Page 178-188
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plaphy.2013.03.004
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000319711700022
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed