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Publication Type J
Authors Debez, A., D. Saadaoui, I. Slama, B. Huchzermeyer and C. Abdelly
Title Responses of Batis maritima plants challenged with up to two-fold seawater NaCl salinity
Source Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science
Author Keywords chlorophyll fluorescence halophyte mineral nutrition photosynthesis proline halophyte cakile-maritima chlorophyll fluorescence salt tolerance sesuvium-portulacastrum proline accumulation photosystem-ii suaeda-salsa water-stress l. resistance
Abstract Batis maritima is a promising halophyte for sand-dune stabilization and saline-soil reclamation. This species has also applications in herbal medicine and as an oilseed crop. Here, we address the plant response to salinity reaching up to two-fold seawater concentration (0-1000 mM NaCl), with a particular emphasis on growth, water status, mineral nutrition, proline content, and photosystem II integrity. Plant biomass production was maximal at 200 mM NaCl, and the plants survived even when challenged with 1000 mM NaCl. Plant water status was not impaired by the high accumulation of sodium in shoots, suggesting that Na+ compartmentalization efficiently took place in vacuoles. Concentrations of Mg2+ and K+ in shoots were markedly lower in salt-treated plants, while that of Ca2+ was less affected. Soluble-sugar and chlorophyll concentrations were hardly affected by salinity, whereas proline concentration increased significantly in shoots of salt-treated plants. Maximum quantum efficiency (F-v/F-m), quantum yield of PSII and electron-transport rate (ETA) were maximal at 200-300 mM NaCl. Both nonphoto(Phi(PSII)), chemical quenching (NPQ) and photochemical quenching (qP) were salt-independent. Interestingly, transferring the plants previously challenged with supraoptimal salinities (400-1000 mM NaCl) to the optimal salinity (200 mM NaCl) substantially restored their growth activity. Altogether, our results indicate that B. maritima is an obligate halophyte, requiring high salt concentrations for optimal growth, and surviving long-term extreme salinity. Such a performance could be ascribed to the plant capability to use sodium for osmotic adjustment, selective absorption of K+ over Na+ in concomitance with the stability of PSII functioning, and the absence of photosynthetic pigment degradation.
Author Address [Debez, Ahmed; Saadaoui, Dhouha; Slama, Ines; Abdelly, Chedly] Ctr Biotechnol, Lab Adaptat Plantes Stress Abiot, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [Debez, Ahmed; Huchzermeyer, Bernhard] Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, D-30419 Hannover, Germany. Debez, A, Ctr Biotechnol, Lab Adaptat Plantes Stress Abiot, Technopole Borj Cedria,BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. ahmed_debez@daad-alumni.de
ISSN 1436-8730
ISBN 1436-8730
29-Character Source Abbreviation J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci.
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2010
Volume 173
Issue 2
Beginning Page 291-299
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1002/jpln.200900222
Unique Article Identifier ISI:000278025900015
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