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Publication Type J
Authors Carreiras, J., J. A. Perez-Romero, E. Mateos-Naranjo, S. Redondo-Gomez, A. R. Matos, I. Cacador and B. Duarte
Title Heavy Metal Pre-Conditioning History Modulates Spartina patens Physiological Tolerance along a Salinity Gradient
Source Plants-Basel
Language English
Author Keywords halophytes osmotic stress pre-conditioning intraspecific variability salt stress electron-transport plant-growth protein photosynthesis model marsh trimerization halophytes metabolism Plant Sciences
Abstract Land salinization, resulting from the ongoing climate change phenomena, is having an increasing impact on coastal ecosystems like salt marshes. Although halophyte species can live and thrive in high salinities, they experience differences in their salt tolerance range, being this a determining factor in the plant distribution and frequency throughout marshes. Furthermore, intraspecific variation to NaCl response is observed in high-ranging halophyte species at a population level. The present study aims to determine if the environmental history, namely heavy metal pre-conditioning, can have a meaningful influence on salinity tolerance mechanisms of Spartina patens, a highly disperse grass invader in the Mediterranean marshes. For this purpose, individuals from pristine and heavy metal contaminated marsh populations were exposed to a high-ranging salinity gradient, and their intraspecific biophysical and biochemical feedbacks were analyzed. When comparing the tolerance mechanisms of both populations, S. patens from the contaminated marsh appeared to be more resilient and tolerant to salt stress, this was particularly present at the high salinities. Consequently, as the salinity increases in the environment, the heavy metal contaminated marsh may experience a more resilient and better adapted S. patens community. Therefore, the heavy metal pre-conditioning of salt mash populations appears to be able to create intraspecific physiological variations at the population level that can have a great influence on marsh plant distribution outcome.

Author Address [Carreiras, Joao; Cacador, Isabel; Duarte, Bernardo] Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, MARE Marine & Environm Sci Ctr, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. [Perez-Romero, Jesus Alberto; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gomez, Susana] Univ Seville, Fac Biol, Dept Biol Vegetal & Ecol, Av Reina Mercedes S-N, Seville 41012, Spain. [Matos, Ana Rita] Univ Lisbon, BioISI Biosyst & Integrat Sci Inst, Plant Funct Genom Grp, Dept Biol Vegetal,Fac Ciencias, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. [Matos, Ana Rita; Cacador, Isabel; Duarte, Bernardo] Univ Lisbon, Fac Ciencias, Dept Biol Vegetal, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal. Duarte, B (corresponding author), Univ Lisbon, Fac Sci, MARE Marine & Environm Sci Ctr, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.; Duarte, B (corresponding author), Univ Lisbon, Fac Ciencias, Dept Biol Vegetal, P-1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plants-Basel
Publication Date Oct
Year Published 2021
Volume 10
Issue 10
Beginning Page 20
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3390/plants10102072
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000712141500001

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