Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.18
or
Publication Type J
Authors Buhmann, A. and J. Papenbrock
Title Biofiltering of aquaculture effluents by halophytic plants: Basic principles, current uses and future perspectives
Source Environmental and Experimental Botany
Author Keywords Constructed wetlands Halophytes Hydroponic systems Marine aquaculture effluents Nutrients shrimp farm effluent coastal salt-marsh aster-tripolium l fish cage farm constructed wetlands waste-water mangrove forests salicornia-bigelovii saline aquaculture pond effluents
Abstract Halophytes comprise a promising group of plants for different applications due to their special physiological characteristics and biochemical composition. Their ability to grow in salt-affected habitats makes them useful for recycling the nutrient-containing effluents from saline aquacultures. The potential of different halophytes for nutrient uptake and remediation has been investigated in several laboratory and field studies and the application of natural and constructed wetlands. Various factors influence the filtration capacity of a halophyte biofilter for aquaculture effluents, such as salinity, flooding, nutrient level, root characteristics and technical applications. Those effects studied so far are characterized and those in need of further study are outlined. Technical aspects in artificial wetlands such as water flow direction, water level, hydraulic retention time and hydraulic loading rate, influence the transformation of the nutrients within the wetland and their uptake by the plants. Open as well as re-circulating systems are considered. Because soil processes are lacking, the application of hydroponic culture shifts the importance of nutrient removal toward plant uptake. This is important when besides the pure nutrient removal the recycling of the nutrients become a focus in terms of sustainability. The economic feasibility, including different utilization possibilities, of selected halophytes with filtering capacities is delineated. The economic attractiveness of a halophytic biofilter can also be upgraded by the use of salt-tolerant species with a commercial value. Modularized versions of waste water treatments by plants in temperate and tropic regions could help to reduce the nutrient load in the bodies of water and to recycle the nutrients. More effort is needed to determine the specific nutrient removal mechanisms within different types of wetlands planted with halophytes and to point out appropriate halophyte species and wetland conditions for different applications. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Author Address [Buhmann, Anne; Papenbrock, Jutta] Inst Bot, D-30419 Hannover, Germany. Papenbrock, J (reprint author), Leibniz Univ Hannover, Inst Bot, Herrenhauserstr 2, D-30419 Hannover, Germany. Jutta.Papenbrock@botanik.uni-hannover.de
ISSN 0098-8472
ISBN 0098-8472
29-Character Source Abbreviation Environ. Exp. Bot.
Publication Date Aug
Year Published 2013
Volume 92
Beginning Page 122-133
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2012.07.005
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000320678600012
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed