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Authors Hurtado-McCormick, V; Kahlke, T; Krix, D; Larkum, A; Ralph, PJ; Seymour, JR
Author Full Name Hurtado-McCormick, V; Kahlke, T.; Krix, D.; Larkum, A.; Ralph, P. J.; Seymour, J. R.
Title Seagrass leaf reddening alters the microbiome of Zostera muelleri
Source MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Seagrass; Microbiome; 16S rRNA genes; Diversity-ecosystem functioning; Pigmentation; Irradiance
Keywords Plus AEROBIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC BACTERIUM; SP NOV.; ERYTHROBACTER-LONGUS; MARINE CYANOBACTERIA; GEN. NOV.; COMMUNITY; DIVERSITY; STRAIN; GROWTH; CAROTENOIDS
Abstract Seagrasses host an extremely diverse microbiome that plays fundamental roles in seagrass health and productivity but may be sensitive to shifts in host physiology. Here, we observed a leaf reddening phenomenon in Zostera muelleri and characterized bacterial assemblages associated with green and reddened leaves to determine whether this change in leaf pigmentation stimulates shifts in the seagrass microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, we observed that the microbiome associated with 4 different leaf pigmentation categories (i.e. green, white, purple and black) differed significantly, with substantial changes in microbiome composition when the tissue is whitened (non-pigmented). Actinobacteria, Rhodobacteraceae, Erythrobacter, Sulfitobacter and Granulosicoccus were enriched in black and/or purple tissues and discriminated these microbiomes from those associated with green leaves. Contrastingly, all `discriminatory' zero-radius operational taxonomic units (zOTUs) were depleted within the communities associated with white samples. While 40% of the abundant zOTUs identified were exclusively associated with a single pigmentation category, only 3% were shared across all categories, indicating partitioning of the phyllosphere microbiome. However, a significant proportion of the `normal' (green) leaf core microbiome was also retained in the core communities associated with black (70%) and purple (70%) tissues. Contrastingly, no core zOTUs were maintained in the white tissues. These results indicate that environmentally driven physiological shifts in seagrasses, such as leaf reddening expressed in response to high irradiance, can impact the seagrass leaf microbiome, resulting in significant shifts in the microbiome of reddened leaves with the most extreme expression (in white tissue of reddened leaves).
Author Address [Hurtado-McCormick, V; Kahlke, T.; Larkum, A.; Ralph, P. J.; Seymour, J. R.] Univ Technol Sydney, Fac Sci, Climate Change Cluster, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia; [Krix, D.] Univ Technol Sydney, Fac Sci, Sch Life Sci, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia
Reprint Address Hurtado-McCormick, V (corresponding author), Univ Technol Sydney, Fac Sci, Climate Change Cluster, Ultimo, NSW 2007, Australia.
E-mail Address valentina.hurtadomccormick@uts.edu.au
ResearcherID Number Hurtado-McCormick, Valentina/AAC-1221-2019; Ralph, Peter/C-5029-2009
ORCID Number Hurtado-McCormick, Valentina/0000-0001-9407-5924; Ralph, Peter/0000-0002-3103-7346; Krix, Dan/0000-0002-0733-1254
Funding Agency and Grant Number Australian Research Council (ARC)Australian Research Council [FT130100218]; Faculty of Science, the Graduate Research School (GRS) at UTS; C3 at UTS
Funding Text We thank the technical staff of the Climate Change Cluster (C3) and the Microbial Imaging Facility (MIF) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), especially Susan Fenech and Michael Johnson for their guidance and help with the microscopic screening of seagrass leaf samples. This research was conducted as part of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Program scheme (Future Fellowship Grant FT130100218 to J.R.S.). Additional funding was provided by the Faculty of Science, the Graduate Research School (GRS) and the C3 at UTS.
Publisher INTER-RESEARCH
Publisher City OLDENDORF LUHE
Publisher Address NORDBUNTE 23, D-21385 OLDENDORF LUHE, GERMANY
ISSN 0171-8630
29-Character Source Abbreviation MAR ECOL PROG SER
ISO Source Abbreviation Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Publication Date JUL 30
Year Published 2020
Volume 646
Beginning Page 29
Ending Page 44
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3354/meps13409
Page Count 16
Web of Science Category Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Document Delivery Number QL6QG
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000621208500003
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