Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Publication Type J
Authors Derbali, W., A. Manaa, B. Spengler, R. Goussi, Z. Abideen, P. Ghezellou, C. Abdelly, C. Forreiter and H. W. Koyro
Title Comparative proteomic approach to study the salinity effect on the growth of two contrasting quinoa genotypes
Source Plant Physiology and Biochemistry
Author Keywords Quinoa Halophyte Proteomic Salt resistance Photosynthesis Oxidative stress stress-responsive proteins polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis salt-tolerance mechanisms oxidative stress thellungiella-halophila physiological-responses lipid-peroxidation root proteome willd. photosynthesis
Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of NaCl salinity (0, 100 and 300 mM) on the individual response of the quinoa varieties Kcoito (Altiplano Ecotype) and UDEC-5 (Sea-level Ecotype) with physiological and proteomic approaches. Leaf protein profile was performed using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). UDEC-5 showed an enhanced capacity to withstand salinity stress compared to Kcoito. In response to salinity, we detected overall the following differences between both genotypes: Toxicity symptoms, plant growth performance, photosynthesis performance and intensity of ROS-defense. We found a mirroring of these differences in the proteome of each genotype. Among the 700 protein spots reproducibly detected, 24 exhibited significant abundance variations between samples. These proteins were involved in energy and carbon metabolism, photosynthesis, ROS scavenging and detoxification, stress defense and chaperone functions, enzyme activation and ATPases. A specific set of proteins predominantly involved in photosynthesis and ROS scavenging showed significantly higher abundance under high salinity (300 mM NaCl). The adjustment was accompanied by a stimulation of various metabolic pathways to balance the supplementary demand for energy or intermediates. However, the more salt-resistant genotype UDEC-5 presented a beneficial and significantly higher expression of nearly all stress-related altered enzymes than Kcoito.
Author Address [Derbali, Walid; Manaa, Arafet; Goussi, Rahma; Abdelly, Chedly] Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Extremophile Plants, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. [Derbali, Walid; Goussi, Rahma] Univ Tunis El Manar, Fac Sci Tunis, Tunis 2092, Tunisia. [Derbali, Walid; Koyro, Hans-Werner] Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Plant Ecol, Heinrich Buff Ring 26-32, D-35392 Giessen, Germany. [Spengler, Bernhard; Ghezellou, Parviz] Justus Liebig Univ Giessen, Inst Inorgan & Analyt Chem, Heinrich Buff Ring 17, D-35392 Giessen, Germany. [Forreiter, Christoph] Univ Siegen, Inst Biol, Nat Wissensch Tech Fak, Adolf Reichwein Str 2, D-57068 Siegen, Germany. [Abideen, Zainul] Univ Karachi, Dr Muhammad Ajmal Khan Inst Sustainable Halophyte, Karachi, Pakistan. Manaa, A (corresponding author), Ctr Biotechnol Borj Cedria, Lab Extremophile Plants, BP 901, Hammam Lif 2050, Tunisia. arafet.manaa@cbbc.rnrt.tn
ISSN 0981-9428
ISBN 0981-9428
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plant Physiol. Biochem.
Publication Date Jun
Year Published 2021
Volume 163
Beginning Page 215-229
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plaphy.2021.03.055
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000648298300022

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed