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Publication Type J
Authors Delatorre-Herrera, J., K. B. Ruiz and M. Pinto
Title The Importance of Non-Diffusional Factors in Determining Photosynthesis of Two Contrasting Quinoa Ecotypes (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) Subjected to Salinity Conditions
Source Plants-Basel
Author Keywords Na+ K+ CO2 assimilation stomatal restrictions non-diffusional diffusional RubisCO activity salt stress glycine betaine gas-exchange chlorophyll fluorescence induced photoinhibition sodium-transport water relations abscisic-acid tolerance plants
Abstract The broad distribution of quinoa in saline and non-saline environments is reflected in variations in the photosynthesis-associated mechanisms of different ecotypes. The aim of this study was to characterize the photosynthetic response to high salinity (0.4 M NaCl) of two contrasting Chilean genotypes, Amarilla (salt-tolerant, salares ecotype) and Hueque (salt-sensitive, coastal ecotype). Our results show that saline stress induced a significant decrease in the K+/Na+ ratio in roots and an increase in glycine betaine in leaves, particularly in the sensitive genotype (Hueque). Measurement of the photosynthesis-related parameters showed that maximum CO2 assimilation (A(max)) in control plants was comparable between genotypes (ca. 9-10 mu mol CO2 m(-2) s(-1)). However, salt treatment produced different responses, with A(max) values decreasing by 65.1% in the sensitive ecotype and 37.7% in the tolerant one. Although both genotypes maintained mesophyll conductance when stomatal restrictions were removed, the biochemical components of Amarilla were impaired to a lesser extent under salt stress conditions: for example, the maximum rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO; V-cmax) was not as affected in Amarilla, revealing that this enzyme has a higher affinity for its substrate in this genotype and, thus, a better carboxylation efficiency. The present results show that the higher salinity tolerance of Amarilla was also due to its ability to control non-diffusional components, indicating its superior photosynthetic capacity compared to Hueque, particularly under salt stress conditions.
Author Address [Delatorre-Herrera, Jose] Univ Arturo Prat, Fac Renewable Nat Resources, Desert Agr Area, Doctoral Program Agr Arid Desert Environm, Iquique 1100000, Chile. [Ruiz, Karina B.] Univ Arturo Prat, Fac Ciencias Salud, Iquique 2120, Chile. [Pinto, Manuel] Univ OHiggins, Inst Agron & Vet Sci, Plant Physiol Lab, Rancagua 2820000, Chile. Delatorre-Herrera, J (corresponding author), Univ Arturo Prat, Fac Renewable Nat Resources, Desert Agr Area, Doctoral Program Agr Arid Desert Environm, Iquique 1100000, Chile. jodelato@unap.cl; karuiz@unap.cl; manuel.pinto@uoh.cl
29-Character Source Abbreviation Plants-Basel
Publication Date May
Year Published 2021
Volume 10
Issue 5
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3390/plants10050927
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000654552600001

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