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Authors Reuveni, J; Gale, J; Zeroni, M
Author Full Name Reuveni, J; Gale, J; Zeroni, M
Title Differentiating day from night effects of high ambient [CO2] on the gas exchange and growth of Xanthium strumarium L exposed to salinity stress
Source ANNALS OF BOTANY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Xanthium strumarium; respiration; photosynthesis; salt stress; sodium chloride; carbon dioxide; atmosphere
Keywords Plus ELEVATED CARBON-DIOXIDE; DARK RESPIRATION RATE; MAINTENANCE RESPIRATION; LOLIUM-PERENNE; MATURE LEAVES; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; TEMPERATURE; PLANTS; ENRICHMENT; SELECTION
Abstract Sodium chloride, at a concentration of 88 mol m(-3) in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution, increased dry weight per unit area of Xanthium strumarium L. leaves by 19%, and chlorophyll by 45% compared to plants grown without added NaCl at ambient (350 mu mol mol(-1)) CO2 concentration. Photosynthesis, per unit leaf area, was almost unaffected. Even so, over a 4-week period, growth (dry weight increment) was reduced in the salt treatment by 50%. This could be ascribed to a large reduction in leaf area ( >60%) and to an approx. 20% increase in the rate of dark respiration (Rd). Raising ambient [CO2] from zero to 2000 mu mol mol(-1) decreased Rd in both control and salinized plants (by 20% at 1000, and by 50% at 2000 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 concentration) compared to Rd in the absence of ambient CO2. High night-time [CO2] had no significant effect on growth of non-salinized plants, irrespective of day-time ambient [CO2]. Growth reduction caused by salt was reduced from 51% in plants grown in 350 mu mol mol(-1) throughout the day, to 31% in those grown continuously in 900 mu mol mol(-1) [CO2]. The effect of [CO2] at night on salinized plants depended on the daytime CO2 concentration. Under 350 mu mol mol(-1) day-time [CO2], 900 mu mol mol(-1) at night reduced growth over a 4-week period by 9% (P <0.05) and 1700 mu mol mol(-1) reduced it by 14% (P <0.01). However, under 900 mu mol mol(-1) day-time [CO2], 900 vs. 350 mu mol mol(-1) [CO2] at night increased growth by 17% (P <0.01). It is concluded that there is both a functional and an otiose (functionless) component to Rd, which is increased by salt. Under conditions of low photosynthesis (such as here, in the low day-time [CO2] regime) the otiose component is small and high night-time [CO2] partly suppresses functional Rd, thereby reducing salt tolerance. In plants growing under conditions which stimulate photosynthesis (e.g. with increased daytime [CO2]), elevated [CO2] at night suppresses mainly the otiose component of respiration, thus increasing growth. Consequently, in regions of adequate water and sunlight, the predicted further elevation of the world atmospheric [CO2] may increase plant salinity tolerance. (C) 1997 Annals of Botany Company.
Author Address BEN GURION UNIV NEGEV,JACOB BLAUSTEIN INST DESERT RES,IL-84990 MIDRESHET BEN GU,ISRAEL
Reprint Address Reuveni, J (corresponding author), HEBREW UNIV JERUSALEM,DEPT BOT,IL-91904 JERUSALEM,ISRAEL.
Times Cited 25
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 35
Publisher ACADEMIC PRESS LTD
Publisher City LONDON
Publisher Address 24-28 OVAL RD, LONDON, ENGLAND NW1 7DX
ISSN 0305-7364
29-Character Source Abbreviation ANN BOT-LONDON
ISO Source Abbreviation Ann. Bot.
Publication Date FEB
Year Published 1997
Volume 79
Issue 2
Beginning Page 191
Ending Page 196
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1006/anbo.1996.0330
Page Count 6
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number WH449
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1997WH44900013
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