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Authors JOHNSON, RC
Author Full Name JOHNSON, RC
Title SALINITY RESISTANCE, WATER RELATIONS, AND SALT CONTENT OF CRESTED AND TALL WHEATGRASS ACCESSIONS
Source CROP SCIENCE
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords RWC; RELATIVE WATER CONTENT (LEAF)
Keywords Plus CARBON ISOTOPE DISCRIMINATION; AGROPYRON; TOLERANCE
Abstract Salinity is a significant factor in reducing stand establishment and productivity of grasses on certain rangeland sites. Research was undertaken to identify crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) Schult.] accessions potentially useful in breeding salt-resistant populations and to determine physiological factors associated with the superior salinity resistance of tall wheatgrass [Thinopyrum ponticum (Podp.) Barkw. & Dewey] compared to crested wheatgrass. Forage production under saline (irrigation with -0.6 MPa NaCl solution) and nonsaline conditions was examined in plants grown in sand culture. Consistent differences in forage salinity resistance (forage dry wt. of salinity stressed plants/forage dry wt. of unstressed plants) were not detected, but crested wheatgrass accessions were identified with both high salinity resistance at germination and high forage production under saline and nonsaline conditions. High forage-producing crested wheatgrass accessions under salinity stress showed certain physiological responses similar to salt-resistant tall wheatgrass. Tall wheatgrass and high producing crested wheatgrass maintained average leaf turgor of 1.0 MPa over a range of NaCl irrigation solutions from 0 to -1.8 MPa, but turgor of low-producing crested wheatgrass was reduced by -1.2 and -1.8 MPa solutions. In -0.6 MPa solutions, tall wheatgrass and high forage-producing crested wheatgrass accessions had higher concentrations of K, lower Na, and lower Na/K ratios in leaves than low-producing crested wheatgrass. Concentrations of K, Na, and Cl in root tissue did not differ in crested wheatgrass. Tall wheatgrass, however, had consistently higher root K, Na, Cl, and lower Na/K ratios than crested wheatgrass. The results suggest that high forage production under saline conditions was related to turgor maintenance, lower Na/K ratios, and mechanisms for partial exclusion of Na in leaves.
Reprint Address JOHNSON, RC (corresponding author), WASHINGTON STATE UNIV,USDA ARS,PLANT GERMPLASM & TESTING UNIT,59 JOHNSON HALL,PULLMAN,WA 99164, USA.
Times Cited 19
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 20
Publisher CROP SCIENCE SOC AMER
Publisher City MADISON
Publisher Address 677 S SEGOE ROAD, MADISON, WI 53711
ISSN 0011-183X
29-Character Source Abbreviation CROP SCI
ISO Source Abbreviation Crop Sci.
Publication Date MAY-JUN
Year Published 1991
Volume 31
Issue 3
Beginning Page 730
Ending Page 734
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.2135/cropsci1991.0011183X003100030039x
Page Count 5
Web of Science Category Agronomy
Subject Category Agriculture
Document Delivery Number FZ644
Unique Article Identifier WOS:A1991FZ64400038
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