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Authors Bishop, N; Martin, DL; Ross, C
Author Full Name Bishop, Nichole; Martin, Daniel L.; Ross, Cliff
Title Effects of multi-stress exposure on the infection dynamics of a Labyrinthula sp.-turtle grass pathosystem
Source MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Seagrass; Stress; Disease; Labyrinthula
Keywords Plus SEAGRASS THALASSIA-TESTUDINUM; EELGRASS ZOSTERA-MARINA; WASTING DISEASE PATHOGEN; CLIMATE-CHANGE; FLORIDA BAY; CRASSOSTREA-VIRGINICA; POPULATION-DYNAMICS; MASS MORTALITY; CORAL DISEASE; SALINITY
Abstract To assess the relationship among environmental stressors, seagrass susceptibility and Labyrinthula virulence, specimens of Thalassia testudinum were exposed to common abiotic stressors (hypersalinity, elevated temperature, nighttime hypoxia and elevated sulfide). Stressors were applied in isolation and in combination using an orthogonal design, incorporating either pulsed (Days 1-7) or sustained (Days 1-14) stress, with pathogen exposure occurring on Days 8-14. Seagrass infection responses were variable yet contingent upon environmental conditions affecting Labyrinthula viability. Following a 1 wk exposure period to any abiotic stressor (pre-infection), T. testudinum samples failed to show any significant drop in effective quantum yield. However, plant photochemistry declined significantly in response to successful infection, which was most prevalent under ambient conditions. Hypersalinity appeared to be the major factor which inhibited in vitro Labyrinthula sp. growth and in planta virulence. These data suggest that in the absence of selected abiotic stressors, Labyrinthula sp. has an enhanced capability of successful infection and can efficiently diminish host health (i.e. suppress photochemistry and lead to enhanced lesions). In summary, relatively short-term exposure to common environmental stressors has a generally negative influence on Labyrinthula sp. viability and virulence that can outweigh the effects of reduced T. testudinum photosynthetic health, essentially yielding an asymmetry favoring host defenses, but this asymmetry also reverses when stress is alleviated. When considering further the potential for complex interactions in this multi-stress system, positive antagonism may be more likely than synergistic or negatively antagonistic outcomes.
Author Address [Bishop, Nichole; Martin, Daniel L.; Ross, Cliff] Univ North Florida, Dept Biol, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA
Reprint Address Ross, C (corresponding author), Univ North Florida, Dept Biol, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.
E-mail Address cliff.ross@unf.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number University of North Florida's Coastal and Marine Biology Program; Academic Affairs Scholarship Grant
Funding Text We thank J. Piggott for input on delimiters used in Fig. A1. This work was conducted under permit no. SAL-12-1172-SR issued through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and was supported by the University of North Florida's Coastal and Marine Biology Program and Academic Affairs Scholarship Grant awarded to C.R.
Times Cited 7
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 7
Publisher INTER-RESEARCH
Publisher City OLDENDORF LUHE
Publisher Address NORDBUNTE 23, D-21385 OLDENDORF LUHE, GERMANY
ISSN 0171-8630
29-Character Source Abbreviation MAR ECOL PROG SER
ISO Source Abbreviation Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Publication Date OCT 13
Year Published 2017
Volume 581
Beginning Page 119
Ending Page 133
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3354/meps12318
Page Count 15
Web of Science Category Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Oceanography
Document Delivery Number FL9NN
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000414582700009
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