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Publication Type J
Authors Guo, R., L. Zhao, K. J. Zhang, H. Y. Lu, N. Bhanbhro and C. W. Yang
Title Comparative Genomics and Transcriptomics of the Extreme Halophyte Puccinellia tenuiflora Provides Insights Into Salinity Tolerance Differentiation Between Halophytes and Glycophytes
Source Frontiers in Plant Science
Author Keywords gene family expansion genome halophyte Puccinellia tenuiflora RNA-seq positive selection salt tolerance proteomic analysis gene-expression abscisic-acid mechanisms selection rice k+ identification evolution
Abstract Halophytes and glycophytes exhibit clear differences in their tolerance to high levels of salinity. The genetic mechanisms underlying this differentiation, however, remain unclear. To unveil these mechanisms, we surveyed the evolution of salinity-tolerant gene families through comparative genomic analyses between the model halophyte Puccinellia tenuiflora and glycophytic Gramineae plants, and compared their transcriptional and physiological responses to salinity stress. Under salinity stress, the K+ concentration in the root was slightly enhanced in P. tenuiflora, but it was greatly reduced in the glycophytic Gramineae plants, which provided a physiological explanation for differences in salinity tolerance between P. tenuiflora and these glycophytes. Interestingly, several K+ uptake gene families from P. tenuiflora experienced family expansion and positive selection during evolutionary history. This gene family expansion and the elevated expression of K+ uptake genes accelerated K+ accumulation and decreased Na+ toxicity in P. tenuiflora roots under salinity stress. Positively selected P. tenuiflora K+ uptake genes may have evolved new functions that contributed to development of P. tenuiflora salinity tolerance. In addition, the expansion of the gene families involved in pentose phosphate pathway, sucrose biosynthesis, and flavonoid biosynthesis assisted the adaptation of P. tenuiflora to survival under high salinity conditions.
Author Address [Guo, Rui] Chinese Acad Agr Sci, Inst Environm & Sustainable Dev Agr, Key Lab Dryland Agr, Beijing, Peoples R China. [Zhao, Long; Lu, Huiying; Bhanbhro, Nadeem; Yang, Chunwu] Northeast Normal Univ, Minist Educ MOE, Key Lab Mol Epigenet, Changchun, Peoples R China. [Zhao, Long] Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Genet & Dev Biol, Beijing, Peoples R China. [Zhang, Kaijian] Beijing Novogene Bioinformat Technol Ltd, Beijing, Peoples R China. Yang, CW (corresponding author), Northeast Normal Univ, Minist Educ MOE, Key Lab Mol Epigenet, Changchun, Peoples R China. yangcw809@nenu.edu.cn
ISSN 1664-462X
ISBN 1664-462X
29-Character Source Abbreviation Front. Plant Sci.
Publication Date Apr
Year Published 2021
Volume 12
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.3389/fpls.2021.649001
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000647464200001

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