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Authors Miller, DL; Yager, L; Thetford, M; Schneider, M
Author Full Name Miller, DL; Yager, L; Thetford, M; Schneider, M
Title Potential use of Uniola paniculata rhizome fragments for dune restoration
Source RESTORATION ECOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords barrier island; dune stabilization; hurricane; revegetation; rhizome; sea oats
Keywords Plus BARRIER-ISLAND; LOUISIANA POPULATIONS; FLORIDA PANHANDLE; HURRICANE-OPAL; NORTH-CAROLINA; SEA OATS; COAST; VEGETATION; BEACH
Abstract Uniola paniculata (sea oats) rhizomes uprooted by hurricanes and deposited as wrack could be salvaged and replanted in dune restoration. To test this unexplored technique, percent tiller emergence was observed for 4 years from U. paniculata rhizomes replanted after submersion in seawater; air exposure of 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 11 days; freshwater rinse; and reburial in pots (watered) or on the beach (with or without supplemental water). In addition, U. paniculata rhizomes uprooted by Hurricane Georges were experimentally planted, and effects of soil salinity and moisture on emergence were tested in the greenhouse. Tiller emergence declined with increasing length of air exposure and decreasing size of rhizome. Tiller survival was enhanced by rainfall, rinsing with salt or fresh water during exposure and immediately after planting or supplemental beach watering. Although emergence was not reduced by soil salinity of 1,800 muS/cm, emergence was reduced by soil salinity of 5,800 muS/cm. Across the 4 years of the study tiller emergence from treated rhizomes varied considerably. U. paniculata rhizomes lost bud viability after 3-5 days of beach exposure, unless fresh water from rainfall, wet burlap storage, or watering was applied within 3 days. Bud viability was extended through 11 days when supplied with water. Thus, reburial within 3-11 days after a storm is a viable restoration technique.
Author Address Univ Florida, Dept Wildlife Ecol & Conservat, W Florida Res & Educ Ctr, Inst Food & Agr Sci, Milton, FL 32583 USA; Nature Conservancy, Camp Shelby Field Off, Camp Shelby, MS 39407 USA; Univ Florida, Dept Environm Hort, W Florida Res & Educ Ctr, Inst Food & Agr Sci, Milton, FL 32583 USA
Reprint Address Miller, DL (corresponding author), Univ Florida, Dept Wildlife Ecol & Conservat, W Florida Res & Educ Ctr, Inst Food & Agr Sci, 5988 Highway 90,Bldg 4900, Milton, FL 32583 USA.
Times Cited 13
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 13
Publisher BLACKWELL PUBLISHING INC
Publisher City MALDEN
Publisher Address 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN, MA 02148 USA
ISSN 1061-2971
29-Character Source Abbreviation RESTOR ECOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Restor. Ecol.
Publication Date SEP
Year Published 2003
Volume 11
Issue 3
Beginning Page 359
Ending Page 369
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1046/j.1526-100X.2003.00006.x
Page Count 11
Web of Science Category Ecology
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number 708NW
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000184575400012
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