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Authors Nabukalu, P; Knott, CA
Author Full Name Nabukalu, Pheonah; Knott, Carrie A.
Title Development and Evaluation of Methods to Identify Sea Oats Breeding Lines for Beaches with Shallow Dunes
Source HORTTECHNOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords coastal erosion; coastal restoration; ornamental grass; saturation tolerance; Uniola paniculata
Keywords Plus UNIOLA-PANICULATA L; SHOOT ELONGATION; COASTAL DUNES; RESPONSES; WATER; TOLERANCE; TRANSPORT; SURVIVAL; GROWTH; DEPTH
Abstract Sea oats (Uniola paniculata) is an aesthetically pleasing native plant used for beach restoration along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Many beaches in this region have shallow, saturated dune profiles, which reduces sea oats survival. The objective of this study was to develop methods to identify saturation-tolerant sea oats breeding lines. Sea oats seedlings were evaluated for saturation tolerance in greenhouse, beach, and field environments from 2010 to 2012. In 2010, sea oats grown under eight treatments (seven greenhouse treatments and a natural beach site) were examined. In 2010, sea oats seedling survival 2 and 3 months after transplanting (MAT) was greatest for four greenhouse treatments (nonflooded control, 6 cm cyclic flood, 6 cm static flood, and 10 cm cyclic flood) and least at the beach environment (Holly Beach, LA). In 2011 and 2012, sea oats grown under six treatments (four greenhouse treatments, a natural beach site, and a saturated field site) were examined. In 2011, sea oats seedling survival 3 MAT ranged from 0.3% to 98%. The nonflooded greenhouse control had the greatest survival, whereas plants grown on dry bench regularly watered with 35 parts per thousand (ppt) saline solution had the least survival. Sea oats constantly flooded with 14 cm of saline water in the greenhouse had the least survival 2 and 3 MAT, 70% and 41%, respectively. Sea oats survival when flooded with 14 cm of fresh water 3 MAT correlated with a saturated beach environment, Holly Beach, LA, 6 MAT (r=0.970, P=0.030) and a saturated field environment, Baton Rouge, 6 MAT (r=0.994, P 0.006). These findings suggest that survival of sea oats grown in a greenhouse in 14 cm fresh water for 3 months correlates to sea oats survival at saturated beaches after 6 months, in the absence of significant storm events. Identifying protocols for selection of saturation-tolerant sea oats lines is essential to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of northern Gulf of Mexico sea oats breeding programs.
Author Address [Nabukalu, Pheonah; Knott, Carrie A.] Louisiana State Univ, Ctr Agr, Sch Plant Environm & Soil Sci, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA
Reprint Address Knott, CA (corresponding author), Univ Kentucky, Res & Educ Ctr, Dept Plant & Soil Sci, POB 469, Princeton, KY 42445 USA.
E-mail Address carrie.knott@uky.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number USDA-NIFAUnited States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Funding Text Financial support for this research was provided by USDA-NIFA.
Publisher AMER SOC HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE
Publisher City ALEXANDRIA
Publisher Address 113 S WEST ST, STE 200, ALEXANDRIA, VA 22314-2851 USA
ISSN 1063-0198
29-Character Source Abbreviation HORTTECHNOLOGY
ISO Source Abbreviation HortTechnology
Publication Date AUG
Year Published 2014
Volume 24
Issue 4
Beginning Page 484
Ending Page 489
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.21273/HORTTECH.24.4.484
Page Count 6
Web of Science Category Horticulture
Subject Category Agriculture
Document Delivery Number CB6MO
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000349741300012
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