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Authors Bruno, JF; Rand, TA; Emery, NC; Bertness, MD
Author Full Name Bruno, John F.; Rand, Tatyana A.; Emery, Nancy C.; Bertness, Mark D.
Title Facilitative and competitive interaction components among New England salt marsh plants
Source PEERJ
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Competition; Facilitation; Interaction strength; Salt marsh
Keywords Plus POSITIVE INTERACTIONS; INTERSPECIFIC INTERACTIONS; SPECIES-DIVERSITY; COMMUNITIES; RECRUITMENT; CALIFORNIA; STRESS; INTERFERENCE; DISTURBANCE; POPULATION
Abstract Intra- and interspecific interactions can be broken down into facilitative' and competitive components. The net interaction between two organisms simply the sum of these counteracting elements. Disentangling the positive and negative components of species interactions is a critical step in advancing our understanding of how the interaction.. between organisms shift along physical and. biotic gradients. We performed a manipulative field experiment to quantify the positive and negative components of the interactions between a perennial forb, Aster tenuifolius, and three dominant, matrix-forming grasses and rushes in a New England salt marsh. Specifically, we asked whether positive and negative interaction components: (1) are unique or redundant. across three matrix-forming species (two grasses; Distichhs spicata and Spartina patens, and one rush; Juncus gerardi), and (2) change across Aster life stages (seedling, juvenile, and adult). For adult Aster the strength of the facilitative component of the matrix-forb interaction was stronger than the competitive component for two of the three matrix species, leading to net positive interactions. There was no statistically significant variation among matrix species in their net or component effects. We found little difference in the effects of J. gerardi on Aster at later life-history stages; interaction component strengths did not differ between juveniles and adults. However, mortality of seedlings in neighbor removal plots was 100%, indicating a particularly strong and critical facilitative effect of matrix species on this forb during the earliest life stages. Overall, our results indicate that matrix forming grasses and rushes have important, yet largely redundant, positive net effects on Aster performance across its life cycle. Studies that untangle various components of interactions and their contingencies are critical to both expanding our basic understanding of community organization, and predicting how natural communities and their component parts will respond to environmental change.
Author Address [Bruno, John F.] Univ N Carolina, Dept Biol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA; [Rand, Tatyana A.] USDA ARS, Northern Plains Agr Res Lab, Sidney, MT USA; [Emery, Nancy C.] Univ Colorado, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Boulder, CO 80309 USA; [Bertness, Mark D.] Brown Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Providence, RI 02912 USA
Reprint Address Bruno, JF (corresponding author), Univ N Carolina, Dept Biol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
E-mail Address jbruno@unc.edu
Funding Agency and Grant Number National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource ManagementNational Oceanic Atmospheric Admin (NOAA) - USA; National Science Foundation grantNational Science Foundation (NSF)
Funding Text This research was funded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management graduate research fellowships to John F. Bruno and Tatyana A. Rand and a National Science Foundation grant to Mark D. Bertness. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. There was no additional external funding received for this study.
Times Cited 3
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 3
Publisher PEERJ INC
Publisher City LONDON
Publisher Address 341-345 OLD ST, THIRD FLR, LONDON, EC1V 9LL, ENGLAND
ISSN 2167-8359
29-Character Source Abbreviation PEERJ
ISO Source Abbreviation PeerJ
Publication Date NOV 29
Year Published 2017
Volume 5
Article Number e4049
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.7717/peerj.4049
Page Count 15
Web of Science Category Multidisciplinary Sciences
Subject Category Science & Technology - Other Topics
Document Delivery Number FO1KR
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000416519600003
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