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Authors Kipkemboi, J
Editors Schagerl, M
Author Full Name Kipkemboi, Julius
Title Vascular Plants in Eastern Africa Rift Valley Saline Wetlands
Source SODA LAKES OF EAST AFRICA
Language English
Document Type Article; Book Chapter
Keywords Plus AQUATIC MACROPHYTES; WESTERN-AUSTRALIA; SOUTH-AUSTRALIA; COMMUNITIES; HALOPHYTES; REGIMES; LAKES
Abstract Plants form a major component of aquatic biota by virtue of their trophic position. Most inland saline ecosystems, particularly lakes in the East African Rift System, are known as spectacular avian habitats. The population density of Lesser Flamingos is especially high due to the frequently high algal biomass productivity, which forms the main food. These environments also provide habitats to a unique vegetation of vascular plants adapted to saline environments. Vascular plants in the littoral zone and the associated floodplains of EARS lakes are dominated by two families-Poaceae and Cyperaceae-but about ten other families are commonly observed in shoreline areas with mild salinity. The two halophytes Cyperus laevigatus and Sporobolus spicatus are common along the shores of most East African saline lakes. Although the contribution of these plants to allochthonous input into the open water may not be significant, they play a significant role in providing nutrition to terrestrial herbivores associated with these ecosystems. The open-water and littoral zones of highly saline lakes are devoid of aquatic macrophytes with a few exceptions where freshwater percolates into the system. In most East African saline wetlands, salinity to some extent limits higher plant diversity. This prevents these ecosystems from being choked by noxious vascular aquatic weeds, particularly floating macrophytes that prefer low salinity conditions. Nonetheless, in some saline wetlands in Australia and parts of Europe, higher plant diversity and biomass occur.
Author Address [Kipkemboi, Julius] Egerton Univ, Dept Biol Sci, POB 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya
Reprint Address Kipkemboi, J (corresponding author), Egerton Univ, Dept Biol Sci, POB 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya.
E-mail Address jkipkemboi@egerton.ac.ke
Times Cited 2
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 2
Publisher SPRINGER INT PUBLISHING AG
Publisher City CHAM
Publisher Address GEWERBESTRASSE 11, CHAM, CH-6330, SWITZERLAND
ISBN 978-3-319-28622-8; 978-3-319-28620-4
Year Published 2016
Beginning Page 285
Ending Page 293
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/978-3-319-28622-8_11
Book Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/978-3-319-28622-8
Page Count 9
Web of Science Category Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Water Resources
Subject Category Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Water Resources
Document Delivery Number BH3FI
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000399606500012
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