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Authors Sieg, RD; Kubanek, J
Author Full Name Sieg, R. Drew; Kubanek, Julia
Title Chemical Ecology of Marine Angiosperms: Opportunities at the Interface of Marine and Terrestrial Systems
Source JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ECOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Review
Author Keywords Salt marsh; Mangrove; Seagrass; Defense; Herbivory; Allelopathy
Keywords Plus SEAGRASS POSIDONIA-OCEANICA; EELGRASS ZOSTERA-MARINA; PLANT-HERBIVORE INTERACTIONS; CALLINECTES-SAPIDUS RATHBUN; GRASS THALASSIA-TESTUDINUM; WASTING DISEASE PATHOGEN; FATTY-ACID-COMPOSITION; JUVENILE BLUE CRABS; SALT-MARSH LITTER; TOP-DOWN CONTROL
Abstract This review examines the state of the field for chemically mediated interactions involving marine angiosperms (seagrasses, mangroves, and salt marsh angiosperms). Small-scale interactions among these plants and their herbivores, pathogens, fouling organisms, and competitors are explored, as are community-level effects of plant secondary metabolites. At larger spatial scales, secondary metabolites from marine angiosperms function as reliable cues for larval settlement, molting, or habitat selection by fish and invertebrates, and can influence community structure and ecosystem function. Several recent studies illustrate the importance of chemical defenses from these plants that deter feeding by herbivores and infection by pathogens, but the extent to which allelopathic compounds kill or inhibit the growth of competitors is less clear. While some phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid act as critical defenses against herbivores and pathogens, we find that a high total concentration of phenolic compounds within bulk plant tissues is not a strong predictor of defense. Residual chemical defenses prevent shredding or degradation of plant detritus by detritivores and microbes, delaying the time before plant matter can enter the microbial loop. Mangroves, marsh plants, and seagrasses remain plentiful sources of new natural products, but ecological functions are known for only a small proportion of these compounds. As new analytical techniques are incorporated into ecological studies, opportunities are emerging for chemical ecologists to test how subtle environmental cues affect the production and release of marine angiosperm chemical defenses or signaling molecules. Throughout this review, we point to areas for future study, highlighting opportunities for new directions in chemical ecology that will advance our understanding of ecological interactions in these valuable ecosystems.
Author Address [Sieg, R. Drew; Kubanek, Julia] Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Biol, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA; [Sieg, R. Drew; Kubanek, Julia] Georgia Inst Technol, Aquatic Chem Ecol Ctr, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA; [Kubanek, Julia] Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Chem & Biochem, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA
Reprint Address Kubanek, J (corresponding author), Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Chem & Biochem, 901 Atlantic Dr, Atlanta, GA 30332 USA.
E-mail Address julia.kubanek@biology.gatech.edu
ORCID Number Kubanek, Julia/0000-0003-4482-1831
Funding Agency and Grant Number NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF) [OCE-1060300]; NSF REUNational Science Foundation (NSF)NSF - Office of the Director (OD) [OCE-0851606]; US Department of Education GAANNUS Department of Education; Directorate For GeosciencesNational Science Foundation (NSF)NSF - Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) [1060300] Funding Source: National Science Foundation
Funding Text The authors thank Kelsey Poulson-Ellestad, Melanie Heckman, and two anonymous reviewers for suggestions that improved the manuscript. NSF grants OCE-1060300 and NSF REU Site Award OCE-0851606, as well as a US Department of Education GAANN fellowship awarded to RDS, has supported our recent research in marine chemical ecology.
Times Cited 22
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 26
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City DORDRECHT
Publisher Address VAN GODEWIJCKSTRAAT 30, 3311 GZ DORDRECHT, NETHERLANDS
ISSN 0098-0331
29-Character Source Abbreviation J CHEM ECOL
ISO Source Abbreviation J. Chem. Ecol.
Publication Date JUN
Year Published 2013
Volume 39
Issue 6
Beginning Page 687
Ending Page 711
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s10886-013-0297-9
Page Count 25
Web of Science Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Ecology
Subject Category Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Document Delivery Number 155TG
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000319770500001
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