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Authors Trevathan, SM; Kahn, A; Ross, C
Author Full Name Trevathan, Stacey M.; Kahn, Amanda; Ross, Cliff
Title Effects of short-term hypersalinity exposure on the susceptibility to wasting disease in the subtropical seagrass Thalassia testudinum
Source PLANT PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Language English
Document Type Article
Author Keywords Hypersalinity; Labyrinthula; Oxidative stress; Photosynthesis; Thalassia testudinum; Wasting disease
Keywords Plus RAPID LIGHT CURVES; BR. HOOK. F; CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE; ZOSTERA-MARINA; LABYRINTHULA-ZOSTERAE; PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSES; XANTHOPHYLL CYCLE; HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE; FLORIDA BAY; SALINITY
Abstract Seagrass meadows are a vital component of coastal ecosystems and have experienced declines in abundance due to a series of environmental stressors including elevated salinity and incidence of disease. This study evaluated the impacts of short-term hypersalinity stress on the early stages of infection in Thalassia testudinum Banks ex Konig by assessing changes in cellular physiology and metabolism. Seagrass short shoots were exposed to ambient (30 psu) and elevated (45 psu) salinities for 7 days and subsequently infected for one week by the causative pathogen of wasting disease, Labyrinthula sp. The occurrence of wasting disease was significantly lower in the hypersalinity treatments. Additionally, while exposure to elevated salinity caused a reduction in chlorophyll a and b content, T. testudinum's health, in terms of photochemical efficiency, was not significantly compromised by hypersalinity or infection. In contrast, plant respiratory demand was significantly enhanced as a function of infection. Elevated salinity caused T testudinum to significantly increase its in vivo H2O2 concentrations to levels that exceeded those which inhibited Labyrinthula growth in a liquid in vitro assay. The results suggest that while short-term exposure to hypersalinity alters selected cellular processes this does not necessarily lead to an immediate increase in wasting disease susceptibility. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
Author Address [Trevathan, Stacey M.; Kahn, Amanda; Ross, Cliff] Univ N Florida, Dept Biol, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA
Reprint Address Ross, C (corresponding author), Univ N Florida, Dept Biol, 1 UNF Dr, Jacksonville, FL 32224 USA.
E-mail Address cliff.ross@unf.edu
ResearcherID Number Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey/X-9178-2019; Ross, Cliff/B-8291-2011
ORCID Number Trevathan-Tackett, Stacey/0000-0002-4977-0757;
Funding Agency and Grant Number University of North Florida, Academic Affairs Division and Environmental Center
Funding Text We thank Dr. Anne Boettcher and Mr. Dan Martin for the Perdido Key Labyrinthula strain and for stimulating discussions. We thank Dr. Dan Moon for assistance with statistical analysis. Funding was provided by the University of North Florida's Coastal Biology Program, Academic Affairs Division and Environmental Center.
Times Cited 21
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 22
Publisher ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER
Publisher City ISSY-LES-MOULINEAUX
Publisher Address 65 RUE CAMILLE DESMOULINS, CS50083, 92442 ISSY-LES-MOULINEAUX, FRANCE
ISSN 0981-9428
29-Character Source Abbreviation PLANT PHYSIOL BIOCH
ISO Source Abbreviation Plant Physiol. Biochem.
Publication Date SEP
Year Published 2011
Volume 49
Issue 9
Beginning Page 1051
Ending Page 1058
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1016/j.plaphy.2011.06.006
Page Count 8
Web of Science Category Plant Sciences
Subject Category Plant Sciences
Document Delivery Number 822TP
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000295072800014
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