Loading content, please wait..
loading..
Logo
Version 3.22
or
Authors Maricle, BR; Lee, RW
Author Full Name Maricle, Brian R.; Lee, Raymond W.
Title Root respiration and oxygen flux in salt marsh grasses from different elevational zones
Source MARINE BIOLOGY
Language English
Document Type Article
Keywords Plus SPARTINA-ALTERNIFLORA LOISEL; PLANT ZONATION; WETLAND PLANTS; GAS-TRANSPORT; SULFIDE; SALINITY; TOLERANCE; PRESSURE; PATENS; GROWTH
Abstract Plants growing in waterlogged environments are subjected to low oxygen levels around submerged tissues. While internal oxygen transport has been postulated as an important factor governing flooding tolerance, respiration rates and abilities to take up oxygen under hypoxic conditions have been largely ignored in plant studies. In this study, physiological characteristics related to internal oxygen transport, respiration, and oxygen affinity were studied in low intertidal marsh species (Spartina alterniflora and S. anglica) and middle to high intertidal species (S. densiflora, S. patens, S. foliosa, a S. alterniflora x S. foliosa hybrid, S. spartinae, and Distichlis spicata). These marsh plants were compared to the inland species S. pectinata and the crop species rice (Oryza sativa), corn (Zea mays), and oat (Avena sativa). Plants were grown in a greenhouse under simulated estuarine conditions. The low marsh species S. anglica was found to transport oxygen internally at rates up to 2.2 mu mol O-2 g fresh root weight(-1) h(-1)supercript stop. In contrast, marsh species from higher zones and crop species were found to transport significantly less oxygen internally, although rice plants were able to transport 1.4 mu mol g(-1) h(-1). Under hypoxic conditions, low marsh species were better able to remove dissolved oxygen from the medium compared to higher marsh species and crops. The oxygen concentration at which respiration rates declined due to limited oxygen (P (crit)) was significantly lower in low marsh species compared to inland and crop species; P (crit) ranged from < 4 mu M O-2 in the low marsh species S. anglica up to 20 mu M in the inland species corn. Flooding-sensitive crop species had significantly higher aerobic respiration rates compared to flooding-tolerant species in this study. Crop species took up 3.6-6.7 mu mol O-2 g(-1) h(-1) while all but one marsh species took up < 3.5 mu mol O-2 g(-1) h(-1). We conclude that oxygen transport, aerobic demand, and oxygen affinity all play important and interrelated roles in flood tolerance and salt marsh zonation.
Author Address Ft Hays State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Hays, KS 67601 USA; Washington State Univ, Sch Biol Sci, Pullman, WA 99164 USA
Reprint Address Maricle, BR (corresponding author), Ft Hays State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, 600 Pk St, Hays, KS 67601 USA.
E-mail Address brmaricle@fhsu.edu
Times Cited 24
Total Times Cited Count (WoS, BCI, and CSCD) 29
Publisher SPRINGER
Publisher City NEW YORK
Publisher Address 233 SPRING STREET, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA
ISSN 0025-3162
29-Character Source Abbreviation MAR BIOL
ISO Source Abbreviation Mar. Biol.
Publication Date APR
Year Published 2007
Volume 151
Issue 2
Beginning Page 413
Ending Page 423
Digital Object Identifier (DOI) 10.1007/s00227-006-0493-z
Page Count 11
Web of Science Category Marine & Freshwater Biology
Subject Category Marine & Freshwater Biology
Document Delivery Number 149CX
Unique Article Identifier WOS:000245125400002
Plants associated with this reference

LEGAL NOTICES — This website is protected by Copyright © The University of Sussex, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. The eHALOPH database is protected by Database Right and Copyright © The University of Sussex and other contributors, 2006, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021. This database is based on an earlier work by James Aronson.
THIS WEBSITE AND THIS DATABASE ARE PROVIDED ON AN "AS IS" BASIS, AND YOU USE THEM AND RELY ON THEM AT YOUR OWN RISK.

Contact email: halophytes@sussex.ac.uk
Credits – Tim Flowers, Joaquim Santos, Moritz Jahns, Brian Warburton, Peter Reed